Culture

iPhone 6 loses to Moto X in latest bend test

Having stunned the world with his initial bend test of the iPhone 6 Plus, Lewis Hilsenteger, of YouTube's Unbox Therapy, tries bending an array of phones. With varying results.

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The iPhone 6 appears to resist the tester's tight fingers better than the iPhone 6 Plus. Some fared less well. Unbox Therapy/YouTube screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET

There's something insanely glorious about buying expensive phones and immediately trying to break them.

And given that the bendability of the iPhone 6 Plus is very likely being discussed at the highest levels of government today, we need to garner as much evidence as we can.

Fortunately, Lewis Hilsenteger of Unbox Therapy, the man who performed the original bend-it-and-beckon that shocked the world, has returned with a more comprehensive demonstration.

This time, he decided to test the iPhone 6 (rather than the eminently bendable 6 Plus) against stiff competition, such as the HTC One M8, the Nokia Lumia 1020 and the Moto X.

There have also been complaints, you see, that inserting the iPhone 6 into various, perhaps slim-fit, pockets also causes an unseemly warping.

Once Hilsenteger applied his expert pressure, he identified a small dent in the iPhone 6's form. He did, though, claim that it's far less bendy than the 6 Plus.

Clearly, it's impossible to know whether he used precisely the same force as he did with the 6 Plus. He insisted, however, that the smaller size of the phone contributed to its additional sturdiness, an argument some logicians might admire.

The really rather gorgeous HTC One M8 cracked under pressure. The allegedly unmistakable sound of loose glue permeated the ether. The screen emerged a touch from its perfect casing too.

The Moto X is, in Hilsenteger's estimation, "solid." It stood as firm and unbending as a guard in a silly hat outside Buckingham Palace. This phone was, for him, the biggest surprise.

The Lumia did apparently make some cracking noises. There was a little movement, but still not so much that it caused alarm.

Those of academic minds and pedantic natures will offer that these particular phones may or may not be perfect examples of their type. They could have been the ones made on a Friday night or on a joyous Monday morning.

It's also impossible to know if Hilsenteger was beginning to lose his strength after so much testing. Fame, too, can sap the energy somewhat.

I hope, though, that the idea of sitting in a bar, say, and attempting to bend your phone until it makes noises and/or its screen pops out will quickly pass. This is no way to accompany a decent sauvignon blanc or even an average craft beer.

Whichever phone you have bought, please consider that it has a certain size, as do you and your pockets. Please, therefore, be wise in how you treat it.

An iPhone owner bemoaning its bentness may be even worse than someone who last week bought a BMW and whines that it's already scratched.