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HP wants you to believe it's as sexy as Apple

Technically Incorrect: In a new campaign for its premium products, HP wants you -- and specifically older millennials -- to believe it's exceptionally upscale and alluring.

Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that's taken over our lives.


hp90.jpg

The target HP user. The annoying man who won't turn his laptop off.

HP screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET

I confess that the words "HP" and "sexy" don't always go together in my sentences.

Other than, perhaps: "Wait, HP used to be sexy?"

That hasn't stopped the company from aiming for allure.

In a new campaign due to launch on Monday, the company tries to seduce you into believing that its so-called family of premium products is the one to be seen with.

The first ads feature the Spectre laptop, one Hewlett-Packard says is the world's thinnest. It impressed my colleague Dan Ackerman when he reviewed it.

However, persuading real people who have come to accept Apple as the upscale style standard won't be easy.

Indeed, the first ad simply shows beauty shots of the laptop intermingled with quotes from reviewers. Instyle thinks it's the most beautiful laptop it's ever seen. Tech Insider thinks HP is "beating Apple at its own game."

Which led me to the inevitable question: Is HP trying to be as sexy as Apple?

A company spokesman told me: "Correct."

He said the company is even rolling out a new logo "to showcase what may be, for many users, a new experience with HP."

A second ad (embedded above) shows a handsome man on a plane, working away on his new Spectre laptop.

The Spectre's looks are so captivating that they enchant the cabin crew -- as much as cabin crew can be enchanted, and even cause the man to get a kick from the youth sitting behind him.

Essentially, then, the target for this campaign is the annoying, arrogant loon who won't turn his laptop off when the plane's about to depart.

HP defines these people as "older millennials." These are the 25- to 35-year-olds "whose influence across the market is growing," the spokesman told me.

But wait, I thought laptops were on their way out. They're going to be replaced by phones and watches, aren't they?