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High-speed pipe dreams?

While companies spend billions of dollars to secure their place in the high-speed Internet race, a hard look past the politics and the hype shows there is still work to be done.

 

 

While companies spend billions of dollars to secure their place in the high-speed Internet race, a hard look past the politics and hype shows there is still work to be done.

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By News.com staff
July 28, 1999, 4 a.m. PT

Living up to the broadband hype
interactive The cable open access debate is shaping up to be the Internet's biggest and most expensive political battle yet, a techno-political Waterloo that could affect the evolution of communications and the medium as a whole.

The pitfalls of high-speed installs
infographic Broadband companies need to take heed, as consumer and business users of both cable modems and digital subscriber lines (DSL) say the installation process is rife with pitfalls.

FCC: Walking the regulatory tightrope
Q&A Federal Communications Commission chairman William Kennard has thrown a bomb into the middle of the open access debate to reestablish his agency's authority over the nascent broadband market.

The next wave in fast Net access
interactive The fight over cable open access may fade into the background once a new wave of broadband technology, like direct fiber-optic cable connections and satellite transmissions, splashes onto the high-speed scene.

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