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Operating Systems

Google's mysterious new Fuchsia OS gets a user interface

New operating system's user interface is based on a card-based design for managing multiple apps, Ars Technica reports.

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The user interface for Google's Fuchsia is designed on a card-based system.

Ars Technica

Fuchsia, the mysterious new operating system under development at Google, is starting to take shape and has acquired a user interface.

The new UI, dubbed Armadillo, features a card-based design for managing multiple apps, according to a profile by Ars Technica. The new interface, first spotted by Hotfixit.net, allows cards to be dragged around and used in a split-screen format.

Fuchsia, which first emerged in August, is vaguely described by Google as an operating system designed for "modern phones and modern personal computers." Complicating things further is that Fuchsia is based on a new kernel called Magenta, while Google's own Android OS is based on the open-source Linux kernel that has been around since 1991.

Launching a new mainstream operating system is hard, but Google has already registered success with Android and Chrome OS. Also, consumers may be happy with Windows, Android, MacOS or iOS, but there is always room for improvement such as stronger security, greater responsiveness and longer battery life.

An operating system manages a device's most basic operations, including registering keyboard clicks, sending data over a network, and juggling the tasks running on a processor. It also stores files on a drive and displays graphics on a screen.

So where might we see Fuchsia pop up? Google's been tight-lipped about its ambitions for Fuchsia.

Google didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.

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