CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

Christmas Gift Guide
Software

Google Recipes brings new food ideas to your search results

Google is rolling out its new Recipe View feature, which allows users to filter their search results to only display recipes. We're hoping to learn to cook something other than toast.

No sooner has Google improved your social life with its Social Search feature updates than it's trying to make your dinner parties infinitely more delicious with Recipe View.

The new option allows you to search for keywords as normal and then filter your results to only display recipes. A search for cheese, for example, would bring up all kinds of results we could never be bothered searching through, but Recipe View allows you to narrow the results to show only recipes that include cheese.

There's any number of ways you can find that delightful meal. Try searching by country of origin, or by your favourite chef or even by event -- a search for stag night will undoubtedly bring a selection of innuendo-named snacks. We don't want to know what we'd find if we searched for locust migration.

The results are displayed with clear star ratings and user reviews to enable food lovers to quickly scan through for the most appetising meal. Results can be further filtered by ingredients, cooking time and even calorie count, allowing you to search for a sticky chocolate gateaux, filter for recipes that take less than 10 minutes to make and have less than 50 calories -- but don't get your hopes up for any results on that one.

Think of it as Google's big open-source recipe book. Having your laptop open on your kitchen counter to follow a recipe won't quite have the same feel as a nice recipe book, and we don't much fancy browsing recipes on a tablet with sticky cake fingers, but it will be a good source of inspiration for food lovers and a valuable teaching guide for those terminally afraid of ovens.

Google Recipe View is being rolled out now in the US and Japan and should be seen in our own searches in the near future.

Take a look at Google's video explaining the new feature with its head chef Scott Giambastiani (hey, why don't we have a head chef?).