CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

Culture

Girls Who Code founder to Ivanka Trump: Don't use my story

Commentary: Reshmi Saujani says she doesn't want to be associated with the first family.

Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that's taken over our lives.


Is she listening to her critics?

Emmanuele Contini, NurPhoto via Getty Images

Everyone fears guilt.

These days, though, one of the greatest fears, I fear, is guilt by association.

In these polarized political times, we don't want even to be seen in the same circles as those with whom we disagree.

And so it is that Ivanka Trump published a book called "Women Who Work: Rewriting the Rules to Success," in which she referenced women she admires.

The slight kink is that not all of these women admire her.

One example is Reshmi Saujani. The founder of Girls Who Code, a program that helps young girls begin to close the gender gap in the tech world, took to Twitter on Tuesday to raise her objections at being quoted by Trump.

".@ivankatrump don't use my story in #WomenWhoWork unless you are going to stop being #complicit #askivanka," she tweeted.

The notion of Ivanka Trump being complicit stems from what some see as her failure to speak out against some of her father's more controversial policies while at the same time touting herself as a role model for women. It was also fueled by a biting sketch on "Saturday Night Live," in which Scarlett Johansson played Ivanka in a mock fragrance ad.

Saujani and Ivanka Trump didn't immediately respond to a request for comment. Ivanka Trump did tell CBS News last month that she didn't know what being complicit really means.

She also said: "I don't know that the critics who may say that of me, if they found themselves in this very unique and unprecedented situation that I am now in, would do any differently than I am doing."

It's all a less than virtuous circle. Just as Saujani seems not to want to be associated with Ivanka Trump for fear of being seen to endorse her, so the first daughter's image is muddied by her association with her father, whose attitude toward women can appear less than enlightened.

Ivanka Trump is now an assistant to the president and an unpaid government employee.

Some believe, or at least hope, that she will impress a little moderation upon his views. Some fear that she will be used to put a more charming face on draconian views.

Perhaps Ivanka Trump herself speaks in code. One day, people might decipher its true meaning.


Technically Incorrect: Bringing you a fresh and irreverent take on tech.

CNET en Español: Get all your tech news and reviews in Spanish.