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Fake groom caught after using iPhone translation app to talk to bride

A man has been jailed for his part in a fake marriage scheme involving women from Eastern Europe. His iPhone use was a giveaway.

Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that's taken over our lives.


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A translation app cannot buy you love. It simply cannot. TeenTesla/YouTube screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET

Even when you're in love, communication isn't always easy.

Sometimes, you wish that someone had an app that transmitted the thoughts behind your words directly into your lover's brain.

Google's working on it, of course. But what if you're getting married to someone whom you don't love at all? And what if that someone happens to be from a foreign country? The best you can do is use a translation app.

I suggest, though, you don't use it in front of a wedding registrar. This is what 38-year-old Avtar Singh did and it landed him in jail.

He was, you see, part of a fake wedding scam involving "fiancees" from Eastern Europe. The idea was that Singh and others who weren't UK citizens, would marry women from the newer countries of the European Union, thereby securing their residency and permission to work in the UK.

As Metro reports, the registrar became even more suspicious when the bride, from the Czech Republic, turned up at the wedding in a dirty dress and appearing to be less than overjoyed at her nuptials.

This all happened in February 2013. However, on Friday, Singh and another man who attempted to marry a Czech woman were jailed for a year for attempting to get around the UK's immigration laws.

If it is your choice to marry someone whom you barely know, please consider that a minimum of basic subterfuge may be necessary.

It's better to whisper sweet nothings, rather than entering them into your iPhone to be translated into Czech.