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Dippin' Dots ice cream launches new cryogenics company

Cryogenics: It's not just for ice cream and bodies. The dessert company wants to help other industries flash-freeze products.

If Dippin' Dots can do this for ice cream, then it can do it for a lot of other products, too.

Dippin' Dots

I know what you're thinking, but Dippin' Dot's new cryogenics company won't be offering to turn your mortal remains into tiny frozen beads. 

The flash-frozen ice cream specialist announced the launch of Dippin' Dots Cryogenics this week to offer its processes and machinery to companies in the pharmaceutical, agricultural, nutraceutical and animal-feed industries. 

The same technology that creates the unusual-looking sweet treats could soon be applied to pretty much anything that needs to be freeze dried. 

"The small pellets provide the ideal surface area for freeze drying while maintaining the integrity of the media culture," Dippin' Dots said in a release. The company suggests the process could be used for probiotics, bacterial cultures and plant extractions.

The Dippin' Dots cryogenic system uses liquid nitrogen to flash freeze regular ice cream into little pellets. The process hits the super-cold temperature of -320 Fahrenheit (-195 Celsius). Dippin' Dots will customize its proprietary equipment to meet the needs of its new clients.

Perhaps the best part of the news release is the accompanying photograph of four Dippin' Dots executives standing in a space-age-looking cryogenics factory as dry ice fog swirls around their feet. It's epic. It will make you want to flash freeze something, anything.

Dippin' Dots executives Michael Barrette, Scott Fischer, Stan Jones and Mark Liebel stand in a fog.

Dippin' Dots