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Defense Department: Y2K test a success

Despite a few glitches, yesterday's test of Year 2000 compliance of the Defense Department's logistical network was a success, officials say.

Despite a few glitches, yesterday's test of Year 2000 compliance of the Defense Department's logistical network was a success, officials said.

After a demonstration at the Defense Department (DOD) Logistics Y2K Operations Center, where the agency carried out what is considered the largest simultaneous Year 2000 test of information systems in the world, DOD officials said they were generally happy with the results.

"We think things went well and shows that the system works as advertised," said Susan Hansen, a DOD spokeswoman.

Despite glitches it considers "understandable," the department is confident it will be able to support the logistical chain come the turn of the century, Hansen said.

Back to Year 2000 Index Page

The DOD has been criticized for being one of the slowest agencies in the government to get its Y2K ducks in order.

This test was designed to ensure that DOD information systems can operate unimpeded throughout the year 2000 date change. Planning for the test began in the fall of 1998 and has involved thousands of individuals representing all military services, Defense agencies, and unified commands, according to a DOD advisory.

DOD-developed information components as well as commercial products, software, hardware, and communications systems in 22 locations participated in the test.

The Year 2000 problem, also known as the millennium bug, stems from an old programming shortcut that used only the last two digits of the year. Many computers now must be modified, or they may mistake 2000 for 1900 and may not be able to function at all, observers warn.

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