CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

Internet

Conspiracy theory lives three years after Di's death

Mohamed Al Fayed, whose son Dodi died in a Paris car crash with Princess Diana three years ago, is turning to the Web to gain support for his claim that the couple was murdered in a conspiracy.

Mohamed Al Fayed, whose son Dodi died in a Paris car crash with Princess Diana three years ago, is turning to the Web to gain support for his claim that the couple was murdered in a conspiracy.

This week Fayed said he will file suit to gain access to U.S. intelligence information that he believes could support his claim. A French investigation concluded last year that the accident was the fault of the chauffeur, who was speeding, on medication and intoxicated, according to authorities.

On the third anniversary of the Aug. 31 accident, Fayed has turned to a Web site--dubbed Alfayed.com--to reassert his highly controversial claims. It is updated regularly.

"Mohamed Al Fayed's personal conviction that his son and Princess Diana were murdered is not some fantasy--it is founded upon a solid body of fact," reads a posting on the Web site. "Taken together, these disturbing facts support a compelling argument that there was indeed foul play."

An open letter from Fayed--titled "accident or murder?"--says: "I know that I am bitterly resented by some members of the British establishment...They should know that the efforts to discredit and destroy me will not succeed and that I will never give up my fight to discover the full facts about the deaths of Dodi and Diana. I am not alone in wanting answers."

A poll asks people whether they support Al Fayed's call for a public inquiry into his claims.

Other Web sites have been created to remember the tragedy--largely focusing on Diana and her humanitarian accomplishments.

A Web site on Althorp, Diana's final resting place, takes people on a "virtual tour" of the estate. It also provides details of Diana's life and lets people book visits to the estate when it is open to the public in July and August. Tours of Althorp ended as scheduled yesterday but will resume again next summer.

Another Web site is dedicated to a memorial fund named in Diana's honor. The fund aims to continue the Princess's humanitarian work. It provides regular updates on contributions.