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Census finds that open source IT professionals make more money

Open source pays more money. It's obvious why this should be the case.

Sydney-based consulting firm Waugh Partners in conjunction with Fujitsu, IBM and NICTA ran a census that showed what many of us have suspected for some time: open source pays more. The census was conducted in open-source savvy Australia, so the results may be skewed somewhat.

Still, it was significant to see that more than 5 percent of the available IT population was surveyed with 57 percent suggesting that they don't get paid to write open source at all, while 10 percent of Australia's IT population are paid to write open-source software full-time and another 33 percent get paid to write open source at least occasionally.

As for how much money is in open source, the answer is "More."

The census indicates full-time salaries for open source workers peak at around A$76,000 to A$100,000 (US$68,758 to US$90,471) and for women salaries peaked from between A$46,000 to A$60,000.

The good news is salaries are three times the national median, so "full-time open source pays more", according to Pia Waugh.

This isn't surprising. Open-source IT workers are more than just automatons who administer others' systems. They are actually co-creators of whatever systems they deploy. Open-source IT professionals are more creative, innovative, and involved in their work.

I'd pay more money for someone like that. Wouldn't you?