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Internet

Bush prepares for transition before election's close

As legal wrangling over who will get the keys to the White House continues, presidential hopeful George W. Bush is looking to the Web for possible transition team applicants.

    As legal wrangling over who will get the keys to the White House continues, presidential hopeful George W. Bush is looking to the Web for possible transition team applicants.

    Confident that he won the top executive post, Bush's newly formed Web site, Bushcheneytransition.com, seeks Republicans interested in serving as part of his Cabinet. He's also taking applications for ambassadorships, judgeships and members of various advisory boards.

    "The hours are long and the pace is intense," the Web site warns, adding that there is "much public and press scrutiny" in taking a high-profile government post.

    The online application requires a computer that supports 128-bit encryption. The site, which has not yet been officially unveiled, also seeks contributions for a possible transition. Federal funds and office space for the presidential transition are being withheld from Bush and Vice President Al Gore until a winner is officially declared.

    That declaration could take a few more days, as the postelection mess in Florida is being sorted out.

    On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court handed a small victory to Bush after setting aside the Florida Supreme Court ruling that had extended the state's deadline for recounting votes.

    The decision was important, but it did not clear the way for a definitive victor. Several other legal questions in various courts still need to be resolved.

    But none of that has stopped Bush from moving forward with his plans to prepare for possible control of the White House. He holds a slim lead in Florida, a state with 25 electoral votes that could give either candidate the presidency.

    Throughout the campaign and even after the election, Bush took advantage of the long reach of the Internet. Republican email lists rivaled those of the Democrats and came in handy for recount contributions to help pay for the legal battles.

    The transition Web site calls on qualified Republicans willing to succumb to the rigors of public service.

    "I will look for people who will work hard to do what's best for America," Bush says on the site.