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Apple need not follow Microsoft on .Net

For all the issues with Java, it is still the preferred language for development of Web-based applications.

     

      
    Apple need not follow Microsoft on .Net

    In response to the July 26 column by Chris LeTocq, "Time for Apple to decide about .Net":

    I have been reading LeTocq for many years and finally felt it necessary to write to let him know that I think he is way off base with his analysis of Apple and the .Net world.

    First, .Net is a lot of hype and very little implementation. I am a senior consultant for (a top) consulting firm. I am involved in Web development on a day-to-day basis and spend a lot of time reviewing and working with new technologies.

    Microsoft would have everyone believe that .Net is everything and that all companies are developing applications for their framework.

    This is just not true. I work with several Fortune 50 and 100 firms. We have one client looking at .Net as a possible solution. The rest of the firms are building applications based around Java. For all the issues with Java, it is still the preferred language for development of Web-based applications.

    Apple?s newest operating system embraces Java fully and now that Microsoft is no longer going to support Java this bodes well for Apple. I have heard industry "experts" suggest that Java is going to die now that Microsoft is not going to support it in XP.

    This is just not so.

    Companies have invested too much money in developing applications based on Java to all of the sudden replace them because Microsoft is not going to support it. I have in the past year worked on over 10 million dollars worth of Java development projects for large corporations. Do you think they are going to throw all that away because Microsoft is not going to support it?

    It is my personal opinion that Microsoft feels that it can drive the market with its decisions. This may have been true 3 to 5 years ago, but there are too many players and too much invested by firms to let this occur.

    With that said I must respectfully disagree with LeTocq. If I am not mistaken, he also predicted the death of Apple several times. Most so-called experts seem to be too narrowly focused on one particular area of a business and seem to think that will dictate how or what will happen. A firm with $4 billion in cash (Dell only has $5 billion) will not disappear overnight--which so many experts seem to think.

    This was exemplified in two of CNET News.com?s recent headlines. One read how badly Apple performed, only beating estimates by 2 cents. The next headline read how wonderful Intel did by beating estimates by 2 cents. News should be presented in an unbiased opinion and I feel that this is not always the case when it comes to Apple or even Microsoft.

    Philip Grossman
    Cap Gemini Ernst & Young
    San Francisco, CA