Apple CEO Tim Cook shares his HomeKit routine

The level of home automation available today with iOS and HomeKit was unimaginable just a few years, says Apple's chief executive.

Apple CEO Tim Cook talks on stage at an October 27, 2016 event.

Stephen Lam, Getty Images

Tim Cook took a slight detour during Apple's quarterly earnings conference call on Tuesday. Instead of just focusing on finances, the CEO shared how he personally uses Siri and HomeKit.

"I'm personally using HomeKit accessories and the Home App to integrate iOS into my home routine," said Cook. "Now when I say 'Good morning' to Siri, my house lights come on and my coffee starts brewing."

Apple HomeKit is a software platform that lives natively in iOS 10 via the Home app. iPhone customers can add devices to the Home app to create advanced scene control. In addition to in-app management, customers can also enlist Siri to do the heavy lifting with single-device commands like, "Set my thermostat to 72 degrees" or multi-device commands like, "I'm home" that simultaneously control the lights, thermostat and window shades.

"When I leave the house, a simple tap on my iPhone turns the lights off, adjusts the thermostat down and locks the doors," said Cook on the call. "When I return to my house in the evening as I near my home, the house prepares itself for my arrival automatically by using a simple geofence. This level of home automation was unimaginable just a few years ago and it's here today with iOS and HomeKit."

Cook also said Apple is "leading the the industry by being the first to integrate home automation into a major platform with iOS 10," which took direct aim at HomeKit competitor Amazon.

While HomeKit works with iPhones and Google's voice control assistant works with Pixel phones, Amazon Alexa doesn't currently work with any phones. That's changing soon, though; Amazon Alexa's inaugural phone integration is slated to arrive this month with the Huawei Mate 9.

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