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Adobe touts adoption rates of AIR, Flash Player 10

Adobe Systems announces record adoption rates of its Adobe AIR and Flash Player 10, after being released less than a year ago.

Updated Friday at 11:16 a.m., with Microsoft comment on Silverlight adoption rate.

Adobe Integrated Runtime and Flash Player 10 have latched onto a tailwind, capturing record adoption rates within a year after their release, Adobe Systems said Thursday.

AIR, software designed for running Web applications on PCs, has received more than 100 million installations, the company said. That figure comes at a time when Adobe is facing new competitors in the market. One such rival said he believes the growing popularity of open-source software will steal AIR's thunder.

Adobe's Flash Player 10, meanwhile, has been installed on more than 55 percent of computers worldwide within the first two months of its release. And Adobe is forecasting that figure to rise even higher, to 80 percent by the second quarter.

That, in part, comes as no surprise, given that Adobe's Flash is already installed on the vast majority of PCs running Windows. Flash Player 10 was the company's major update to improve the way its audio, video, and graphics run on systems.

For Adobe, such results on its Flash Player 10 installation, nonetheless, bode well for the company, considering that Flash Player 10 launched within days after Microsoft debuted its rival Silverlight 2.0 software.

Microsoft's Silverlight 2.0 has been installed on more than 100 million PCs since its launch in October of 2008, according to a Microsoft representative.

"Currently, one in four consumers worldwide have access to a computer with Silverlight technology already installed. We expect to have more users around the world--hundreds of millions more, in fact--consuming and experiencing Silverlight-based content and applications in their homes and enterprises over the coming months and years," the Microsoft representative noted in an e-mail interview.