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Short Take: Quantum expands storage appliance line

Quantum has added two new models to its line of storage appliances, beefed-up hard disks that plug into a network. The 15-GB version costs $499, the 30-GB version goes for $799 and the 60-GB version costs $1,699. The company also has a rack-mountable 120-GB version for $1,999. Quantum and competing hard disk manufacturer Maxtor both make simple and inexpensive devices that fit into the "network-attached storage" category of stand-alone data storage devices that reside on primary computer networks instead of being attached to a specific server or to a separate network for storage devices.

Stephen Shankland Former Principal Writer
Stephen Shankland worked at CNET from 1998 to 2024 and wrote about processors, digital photography, AI, quantum computing, computer science, materials science, supercomputers, drones, browsers, 3D printing, USB, and new computing technology in general. He has a soft spot in his heart for standards groups and I/O interfaces. His first big scoop was about radioactive cat poop.
Expertise Processors | Semiconductors | Web browsers | Quantum computing | Supercomputers | AI | 3D printing | Drones | Computer science | Physics | Programming | Materials science | USB | UWB | Android | Digital photography | Science Credentials
  • Shankland covered the tech industry for more than 25 years and was a science writer for five years before that. He has deep expertise in microprocessors, digital photography, computer hardware and software, internet standards, web technology, and more.
Stephen Shankland
Quantum has added two new models to its line of storage appliances, beefed-up hard disks that plug into a network. The 15-GB version costs $499, the 30-GB version goes for $799 and the 60-GB version costs $1,699. The company also has a rack-mountable 120-GB version for $1,999. Quantum and competing hard disk manufacturer Maxtor both make simple and inexpensive devices that fit into the "network-attached storage" category of stand-alone data storage devices that reside on primary computer networks instead of being attached to a specific server or to a separate network for storage devices.