X

Organic Online files to go public

Organic, which provides strategic consulting, builds Web sites and helps companies with marketing and brand building, follows in the wake of successful IPOs by rivals including Scient, Viant and Proxicom.

Kim Girard
Kim Girard has written about business and technology for more than a decade, as an editor at CNET News.com, senior writer at Business 2.0 magazine and online writer at Red Herring. As a freelancer, she's written for publications including Fast Company, CIO and Berkeley's Haas School of Business. She also assisted Business Week's Peter Burrows with his 2003 book Backfire, which covered the travails of controversial Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly Fiorina. An avid cook, she's blogged about the joy of cheap wine and thinks about food most days in ways some find obsessive.
Kim Girard
Internet services firm Organic Online today announced its intent to go public.

In a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Organic said it plans to use funds raised in an initial offering of common stock to expand corporate infrastructure, reduce its debt and meet general corporate needs. The filing did not set the number of shares the company plans to offer the public.

The offering will be managed by a group of underwriters led by Goldman Sachs and Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette, and co-managed by Thomas Weisel Partners, according to the company's SEC registration.

Organic, which provides strategic consulting, builds Web sites and helps companies with marketing and brand building, will trade on the NASDAQ under the symbol "OGNC." The move follow a host of successful IPOs by rivals including Scient, Viant and Proxicom.

Founded in 1993 and led by CEO Jonathan Nelson, San Francisco-based Organic has done work for 250 clients, including Blockbuster, Boo.com, Chase Manhattan Bank, CDNOW, Compaq, DaimlerChrysler, Tommy Hilfiger and Washington Mutual. Organic has offices in the United States, Asia, Europe and Latin America. The company has about 700 employees.