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3GIO technology dubbed "PCI Express"

SEATTLE--The Third-generation input-output (3GIO) standard spawned by Intel and now backed by others has been given a formal name: PCI Express. The PCI-SIG announced the name Wednesday at Microsoft's Windows Hardware Engineering Conference (WinHEC) conference here. PCI is a standard way to plug devices such as network cards into a computer, but PCI Express will enable faster communications when it begins arriving at the end of 2003, its advocates say. The standard will first be used to connect chips within a computer and the graphics subsystem, with high-speed network cards to follow, supporters expect. A draft of PCI Express version 1.0 has been turned over for PCI-SIG's more than 740 members to review, and the final version is expected by a June 3-4 developer conference.

Stephen Shankland Former Principal Writer
Stephen Shankland worked at CNET from 1998 to 2024 and wrote about processors, digital photography, AI, quantum computing, computer science, materials science, supercomputers, drones, browsers, 3D printing, USB, and new computing technology in general. He has a soft spot in his heart for standards groups and I/O interfaces. His first big scoop was about radioactive cat poop.
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  • Shankland covered the tech industry for more than 25 years and was a science writer for five years before that. He has deep expertise in microprocessors, digital photography, computer hardware and software, internet standards, web technology, and more.
Stephen Shankland
SEATTLE--The Third-generation input-output (3GIO) standard spawned by Intel and now backed by others has been given a formal name: PCI Express. The PCI-SIG announced the name Wednesday at Microsoft's Windows Hardware Engineering Conference (WinHEC) conference here.

PCI is a standard way to plug devices such as network cards into a computer, but PCI Express will enable faster communications when it begins arriving at the end of 2003, its advocates say. The standard will first be used to connect chips within a computer and the graphics subsystem, with high-speed network cards to follow, supporters expect. A draft of PCI Express version 1.0 has been turned over for PCI-SIG's more than 740 members to review, and the final version is expected by a June 3-4 developer conference.