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Standards group OKs math markup language

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) recommended MathML 2.0, giving its seal of approval to the XML dialect. MathML lets Web authors include mathematical notation in their pages and lets others reuse and transform those equations. Improvements over MathML 1.0 include an extended set of symbols and expressions and better integration with other W3C recommendations including Cascading Style Sheets for adding style elements to multiple Web pages and XML Linking Language, or XLink, for linking to XML pages. XML, or Extensible Markup Language, is a technology that lets people design industry- or task-specific markup languages.

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) recommended MathML 2.0, giving its seal of approval to the XML dialect. MathML lets Web authors include mathematical notation in their pages and lets others reuse and transform those equations.

Improvements over MathML 1.0 include an extended set of symbols and expressions and better integration with other W3C recommendations including Cascading Style Sheets for adding style elements to multiple Web pages and XML Linking Language, or XLink, for linking to XML pages. XML, or Extensible Markup Language, is a technology that lets people design industry- or task-specific markup languages.