X

FBI Shuts Down Marketplace Selling 24 Million Social Security Numbers

The websites made about $19 million in revenue from selling SSNs, names and dates of birth.

corinne-reichert-headshot
corinne-reichert-headshot
Corinne Reichert Senior Editor
Corinne Reichert (she/her) grew up in Sydney, Australia and moved to California in 2019. She holds degrees in law and communications, and currently writes news, analysis and features for CNET across the topics of electric vehicles, broadband networks, mobile devices, big tech, artificial intelligence, home technology and entertainment. In her spare time, she watches soccer games and F1 races, and goes to Disneyland as often as possible.
Expertise News, mobile, broadband, 5G, home tech, streaming services, entertainment, AI, policy, business, politics Credentials
  • I've been covering technology and mobile for 12 years, first as a telecommunications reporter and assistant editor at ZDNet in Australia, then as CNET's West Coast head of breaking news, and now in the Thought Leadership team.
Corinne Reichert
doj-seized-banner

The FBI targeted a marketplace selling more than 20 million SSNs.

DOJ

The FBI, Department of Justice and Internal Revenue Service have shut down a series of websites that they allege were selling 24 million Social Security Numbers, names and dates of birth of people living in the US.

The SSNDOB Marketplace made about $19 million in revenue while it operated, according to an announcement from the agencies Tuesday.

Working with local police in Cyprus and Latvia, the FBI, DOJ and IRS executed seizure orders on June 7 against four domain names associated with the SSNDOB Marketplace.

"Identity theft can have a devastating impact on a victim's long-term emotional and financial health," Darrell Waldon, a special agent with the IRS' Criminal Investigation agency, said in a statement. "Taking down the SSNDOB website disrupted ID theft criminals and helped millions of Americans whose personal information was compromised."

Read more on security: Ukraine Successfully Defends Its Cyberspace While Russia Leans Heavily on Guns, Bombs