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Best Anime Streaming Services of 2024

Discover the best anime streaming platforms, where you can find everything from Attack on Titan to Jujutsu Kaisen to Spy x Family and beyond.

Updated Feb. 5, 2024 5:15 a.m. PT

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Written by  Kourtnee Jackson
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Kourtnee Jackson Senior Editor
Kourtnee covers TV streaming services and home entertainment news and reviews at CNET. She previously worked as an entertainment reporter at Showbiz Cheat Sheet where she wrote about film, television, music, celebrities, and streaming platforms.
Expertise Kourtnee is a longtime cord-cutter who's subscribed to streaming services like Netflix, Hulu, Disney Plus, HBO Max, Crunchyroll, Sling, Spotify and more. As a real-life user of these services, she tracks the latest developments in streaming, the newest re Credentials
  • Though Kourtnee hasn't won any journalism awards yet, she's been a Netflix streaming subscriber since 2012 and knows the magic of its hidden codes.
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What to consider

Price

Simulcasts

Simultaneous streams

Catalog offerings

$8 at Crunchyroll
animated characters in Jujutsu Kaisen smile as they power through ice
Best anime streaming service overall
Crunchyroll
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$10 at Hulu
young man stands with sword on his back against red backdrop
Best alternative to Crunchyroll for popular simulcasts
Hulu
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$7 at Netflix
cyberpunk
Best for original, quality anime and well-known titles
Netflix
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$5 at Hidive
animated singer stands on stage facing the crowd
Best budget-friendly streamer for uncensored content and throwbacks
Hidive
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What is the best overall anime streaming service?

Anime fans have two primary ways to keep up with popular stories like Jujutsu Kaisen or Attack on Titan. You can either read manga on an app or take in the newest seasons of your favorite shows on a streaming service. There are many platforms that stream anime, but Crunchyroll is our top choice. Why? Its catalog is the largest in the genre, new episodes are released as simulcasts from Japan and premium subscriptions offer additional perks like merchandise. Available in more than 200 countries, Crunchyroll allows you to stream legally and without ads.

We tested each of these streaming services based on library size, availability of new releases, price, features and user experience. The platforms on this best list all offer access to anime films and TV series, and our selections can help you choose which service is best for you and your tastes. Subscribe and get your fill, whether you're a die-hard anime fan with niche tastes, an occasional viewer or a newbie.

Read more: These Anime Shows Are Now Free to Watch on YouTube

Best anime streaming services of 2024

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$8 at Crunchyroll

Best anime streaming service overall

Crunchyroll

Because of its robust stable of content, Crunchyroll has become the global destination for anime streaming. The brand boasts over 100 million registered users and more than 5 million subscribers. Crunchyroll merged its vast lineup with fellow genre titan Funimation to deliver thousands of titles 24/7. All that anime is under one umbrella, which includes Attack on Titan, Demon Slayer, Jujutsu Kaisen and To Your Eternity. According to Crunchyroll, it's now "the world's largest anime library of more than 40,000 episodes." 

The biggest selling points? New episodes land on the streamer one hour after they premiere in Japan. Viewers can also count on surprise releases like special OAD episodes when shows are on break. Anime fans love the variety and appreciate that for some content, they can watch the uncut Japanese versions of their favorite series on this service. Additionally, there's a carousel of original, in-house creations that spin alongside the freshest releases out of Japan. 

You can sign up for a free account to stream ad-supported content on the service. Just note that not all titles are available with this version, and there is a wait for new releases. However, anime watchers who want immediate access to new episodes should opt for Crunchyroll's basic $8 ad-free subscription. There's a free 14-day trial for new subscribers.

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$10 at Hulu

Best alternative to Crunchyroll for popular simulcasts

Hulu

If you're on the fence about a Crunchyroll subscription, Hulu boasts more than 300 anime titles and is a prime stop to watch hits My Hero Academia, Boruto: Naruto Next Generations, Attack on Titan, Soul Eater and more. Hulu is the exclusive streamer for Bleach: Thousand-Year Blood War in the US. There are also simulcasts that stream each season, treating viewers to the newest releases from Japan. This is an area where Hulu one-ups Netflix. Fans will find Pokemon films and oldies but goodies like Sailor Moon and Akira too.

Hulu also has partnerships with Crunchyroll and Funimation to carry some titles, but not their entire catalogs. However, new subtitled episodes may arrive immediately on the streamer while dubbed versions take longer. Debut times vary depending on the series.

An added benefit is the dedicated Anime Hub, where you'll find content organized into categories such as classic, A-Z or simulcasts. Hulu starts at $10 a month.

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$7 at Netflix

Best for original, quality anime and well-known titles

Netflix

Netflix has increased its anime offerings, though it lacks the fresh installments and simulcasts of Hulu. There are currently dozens of Japanese imports on the platform as well as Netflix originals Cyberpunk: Edgerunners, Onimusha, Castlevania and Pluto.

Though it's not the go-to for more obscure titles, Netflix has a reliable selection of popular anime that includes Vinland Saga, Demon Slayer, JoJo's Bizarre Adventure and nine glorious seasons of Naruto. Some of its latest releases include Junji Ito Maniac: Japanese Tales of the Macabre, Aggretsuko, Ultraman and The Way of the Househusband.

Another major plus for the streamer is the option to watch without ads if you pay for a plan that's $15.49 or more. But subscribers should be aware they'll need to take the extra step of nixing the skip function when episodes end to see if there are post-credits scenes in their favorite show. Netflix starts at $7 a month.

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$5 at Hidive

Best budget-friendly streamer for uncensored content and throwbacks

Hidive

A cheap option for viewers, Hidive streams content to fans around the globe, including simulcasts. Not only will you find curated anime from all subgenres, but there's an assortment of live-action adaptations too. And though the service has family-friendly titles, it caters to the 18-and-older crowd. Because of a new deal between its parent company AMC Networks and MBS, Hidive will be the exclusive streaming platform for titles such as The Most Heretical Last Boss Queen: From Villainess to Savior. You'll also find the popular Oshi no Ko and The Eminence in Shadow here.

Hidive prides itself on its customizable subtitle options, in-episode live chats and exclusive catalog. You can even choose between censored and uncensored anime. An independent service, the company encourages fans to request their favorite titles if they can't find them on the platform.

Hidive is supported on iOS, Android and smart TVs, and it runs content directly through its site. There's no free subscription option, and the monthly rate is $5 after the 7-day free trial.

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How we test anime streaming services

You probably have experiences with the services on this list, and there are other ways to stream anime titles, including YouTube. As we evaluated these streaming options, we considered a few things.

We first analyzed the library size, simulcast availability, cost, subscription offerings and app quality. We scrolled through catalogs, app layout and design (i.e., content organization, ads), features (like mobile downloads, recommendations, and watchlists) and value (price compared to these other factors).

Other streaming services we tested

YouTube: YouTube offers a slate of anime for free from distributors such as VIZ media, but its rotation changes based on copyright and licensing agreements. However, it's a good place to start if you want to try anime without springing for a subscription.

Disney Plus: Disney Plus has a very limited lineup of Japanese anime available for its US subscribers, so it lacks the catalog that would make it a prime source for shows and movies. International subscribers will find a small selection of anime.

Factors to consider

  • Selection of anime programming: Some streaming services provide simulcasts that premiere episodes at the same as -- or immediately after -- they broadcast in Japan. They typically post their schedules. You will find a wide range of on-demand shows and movies from every era or genre, including family-friendly anime, originals and lesser-known titles, so choose platforms that cater to your interests.
  • Parental controls: There are some services that don't offer the ability to change age ratings or block certain content. If you have kids using your subscription, you may need to adjust maturity settings or manually monitor which anime content your child can watch.
  • Simultaneous streams: Services usually charge more for more streams. Be sure you're covered for yourself and other members of your household and consider whether you have to pay extra to share your account.
  • Finding shows and movies: Is the interface user-friendly? It should be fairly easy to search for things to watch using menus and other features. 

Anime streaming FAQs

What's the difference between dub and sub?

In the anime community, the terms dubbed and subbed are used to describe the difference between a piece of content that streams in Japanese with subtitles or an English-dubbed (or other language) version. It's a matter of personal preference, but some fans prefer one type over the other. Funimation (before its merger with Crunchyroll) was once known for its extensive dubbed collection.

Why can't I find certain anime content on some streaming services?

Due to licensing agreements, some streaming providers' anime lineups will change. This also depends on which country you live in, as various content may be available only in Japan, the US or other regions.

Timing plays a role and can determine whether a series' new season or movie hits a platform the same day, month or year of its original release. However, viewers will notice that some shows are streaming on multiple platforms at the same time.

What is the meaning of OAD and OVA in anime and does it matter?

From time to time, you may see streaming services refer to OAD or OVA as special promotions. Generally, OAD and OVA are extra episodes that didn't air on television but are part of the story and may or may not be canon. They can be prequel episodes or storylines that happen during or after what's seen in a series and act as cool additions for anime lovers.

Which devices support these apps?

Each of these anime streaming providers are accessible via their standalone websites, smart TVs, Roku, iOS, Android, Chromecast, Amazon FireTV, Apple TV and Xbox One devices. You can watch it on your phone, tablet, PC or TV.