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Firefox Send file-sharing service arrives on Android, too

Mozilla's service lets you share 1GB files with no strings attached and 2.5GB files if you sign in.

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Mozilla's Firefox Send service lets you send 1GB files without having to log in. The encrypted files expire automatically, leaving no trace once they're gone.

Mozilla's Firefox Send service lets you send 1GB files without having to log in. The encrypted files expire automatically, leaving no trace once they're gone, Mozilla says.

Mozilla

Owners of Android phones now also can use Firefox Send, the Mozilla  service that lets you send 1GB files with a simple website address.

The Android app, released Friday, works the same as the browser-based version of the service that the nonprofit organization formally launched earlier in March after months of testing. It lets you share 1GB files that are protected by encryption and that require no sign-in. Mozilla lifts the file size limit to 2.5GB if you log in with a Firefox account.

Other services, like Dropbox, Box, Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive and WeTransfer, already exist. Mozilla touts its alternative as focused on privacy since it doesn't leave traces on the web.

How about a version for iPhones and other iOS-powered devices? That's not yet clear.

"We will review usage of the Send for Android Beta and determine if there is a need for an iOS launch," Mozilla said in a statement.

With Firefox Send, you can add optional password protection, define how many times a file may be downloaded, and set an expiration date after which the file is deleted. There's no way to keep files available indefinitely.

The service is part of Mozilla's effort to expand its reach beyond its best-known product, the Firefox web browser. Firefox has faded in popularity compared with Google's dominant Chrome and is a rarity on Android phones and iPhones .

Originally published March 22, 12:30 p.m. PT.
Update, 1:58 p.m.: Adds Mozilla comment about a possible iOS version.