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Cell phones and radiation

Cell phones and radiation

Kent_German.jpg
Kent_German.jpg
Kent German Former senior managing editor / features
Kent was a senior managing editor at CNET News. A veteran of CNET since 2003, he reviewed the first iPhone and worked in both the London and San Francisco offices. When not working, he's planning his next vacation, walking his dog or watching planes land at the airport (yes, really).
Kent German
The ongoing debate over cell radiation entered yet another phase this week when the British Medical Journal published a study that found using a cell phone does not pose a greater risk of developing a brain tumor. Researchers from three universities and a London cancer research institute conducted a four-year study of 996 adults with glioma, a type of brain cancer. An additional 1,716 healthy subjects acted as a control group. "Use of a mobile phone, either in the short or medium term, is not associated with an increased risk of glioma. This is consistent with most but not all published studies," the study said.

But wait, there's more. Like every other study on the subject, this newest research is inconclusive at best; it didn't prove there is a risk, but it didn't prove there isn't one either. As a result, expect cell phone radiation to remain a controversial subject. For more information, see CNET's cell phone radiation charts.