Apple's record earnings Happy Data Privacy Day Neil Young pulls music from Spotify Our Wordle obsession Minnie Mouse pantsuit Free N95 masks

Apple's WWDC 2014 keynote: Join us Monday (live blog)

The Cupertino, Calif., company will kick off its annual developers conference at 10 a.m. PT on Monday. CNET will be there to bring you all the news, photos, and commentary.

This story is part of WWDC 2021. All the latest coverage from Apple's annual developers conference.
wwdc-2014-setup-7041.jpg
Workers get Moscone Center in San Francisco ready for Apple's developer conference. James Martin/CNET

The countdown for Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference has begun, and CNET will be on hand to bring you all the action.

The Cupertino, Calif., holds only two or three major events a year, and WWDC is one of them. The annual confab for developers takes place June 2 to 6 in San Francisco, and this year, about 5,000 lucky, lottery winning app makers will descend on the city's Moscone Center to hear from Apple itself.

The company will kick off the event with its highly anticipated, two-hour keynote at 10 a.m. PT on Monday. CNET will bring you all the news, photos, and commentary from the event. We'll start things off with a live show with Brian Tong and Donald Bell, as well as Ashley Esqueda and Rich Demuro, hosts of CNET's new show, Tomorrow Daily. You can figure out what time the keynote will start in your timezone here.

Tune into CNET's live show and blog at 9 a.m. PT on June 2.

Apple has used its WWDC keynote as a chance to introduce new products in the past, but more recently has focused on software, saving new mobile device announcements for separate events. This year's conference won't be any different, sources tell CNET, with the company saving its hardware announcements for later in the year.

Now playing: Watch this: What to expect at WWDC 14
6:32

Instead, Apple will detail new software features and services, particularly for its iOS mobile operating system and Mac OS X operating system. The PC software, OS X, should be getting a design overhaul, while iOS 8 is expected to add features such as a Healthbook hub for collecting health and fitness data in one place.

Apple also could roll out home-automation software, mobile payments, and various features users -- and bloggers - haven't even considered.

For Apple, this year's developer conference comes at a critical time. Apple continues to sell millions of iPhones and iPads, but demand for the devices has started to slow. Google' Android software, and particularly vendors such as Samsung, have been gaining market share and also have made inroads in former Apple strongholds like education. Apple also hasn't released any truly revolutionary products since the iPad in 2010, while rivals such as Samsung introduce new devices every few months.

Apple has promised exciting this year and its best product lineup in 25 years, but the timeline for keeping that vow is narrowing. More than anything, Apple has to show that it hasn't "lost its mojo" like some investors and Apple watchers have surmised. But people expecting Apple to wow the market with innovative new product categories may have to wait a little longer.

"If anything, the bar is set pretty low going into this year's WWDC," BTIG analyst Walter Piecyk said.

Tune back to CNET for full coverage of Apple's WWDC.