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Scuf's new PS5 controllers include FPS-targeted model

DualSense adaptive triggers and back paddles are the highlights of the updated line.

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Scuf

Scuf's game controllers are distinguished by their nth-degree customizability, including paddles at the back (on select models), accessible by the fingers you've got wrapped around the grip. The company's latest trio of controllers, the Reflex, Reflex Pro and Reflex FPS, all have four paddles, and the Reflex and Reflex Pro support Sony's DualSense adaptive triggers. The controllers all work with Windows (7 or later) as well as the PS5.

You can get them all now, though they're not cheap, probably costing more than usual because of the DualSense support. Then again, since you probably haven't been able to buy a PS5 yet, you'll likely already have the money. The Scuf Reflex starts at $200, the Reflex Pro starts at $230 and the Reflex FPS starts at $260.

Each of the back paddles can be configured without software and you can swap configurations on the fly. The FPS model ditches the adaptive triggers and force feedback motors, because weight, consistency and stability can matter more for aiming accuracy than improved sensation. 

The FPS model also has instant bumpers and triggers, which you can toggle on or off for many of Scuf's other controllers but not the other Reflex models. That's too bad, because for PC gaming I like to configure my triggers with instant on the right and not on the left, since I usually just need quick response for shooting. Plus, I like to have the option. Because you never know what changing game mechanics may require.

Scuf says the updated grip on the Pro and FPS is more comfortable than previous models and that all the models have improved thumbsticks. In fact, it sounds like it incorporates the enhancements that Scuf rolled out for its Instinct line of Xbox controllers in August. All the usual faceplate and thumbstick options are also available in these. 

As with the Instinct updates, though, Scuf has dropped the swappable paddles, instead integrating them into the body. I'm not thrilled with the positioning and size of the ones on the Instinct -- I wish they were bigger and less slippery -- but PlayStation controllers are wider and that might make a difference.