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Tether directly to an iPad Pro from the new mirrorless Hasselblad X1D II 50C

Performance and ergonomics on this mirrorless camera improve, while the price gets competitive.

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The X1D II 50C looks very similar to its predecessor, but the silver has darkened to gray.

Lori Grunin/CNET

Three years ago, high-end camera manufacturer Hasselblad launched the first mirrorless medium-format camera, the 50-megapixel X1D-50c. Since then, Fujifilm's GFX series has come along with aggressive prices that have gotten as low as $4,000 compared to the X1D's launch price of twice as much. For its follow-up model, the X1D II 50C, Hasselblad fine-tunes the X1D and brings it forth at a more appealing price that competes more directly with the $5,500 or so Fujifilm GFX 50S. The company also introduced its first medium-format zoom lens, a 35-75mm f3.5-4.5 model (equivalent to roughly 27-58mm) with internal focus.

The X1D II 50C is in preorder now and will ship  in July for $5,750 (£4,500; directly converted, about AU$8,375); the XCD 35-75mm 3.5-4.5 lens will cost almost as much when it becomes available in October: $5,175 (£4,050, about $7,525). 

Based primarily on feature requests from current owners, the X1D II offers incremental updates over the X1D; it has the same sensor and design with some minor interface changes. However, it's generally faster and more responsive thanks to a new processor, with a slightly higher continuous shooting rate of 2.7fps and more accurate, movable and resizable autofocus areas. 

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You can now tether the camera to an iPad Pro physically via USB-C 

Lori Grunin/CNET

It also sports a larger, higher magnification OLED viewfinder and a bigger back display with better color reproduction. You can charge via the USB-C connection, as well as to physically tether the camera to an iPad Pro for shooting, transferring and editing photos with the updated Phocus app; traditionally, you could only perform remote shooting and image transfer via Wi-Fi on iPads.  

Hasselblad expanded the JPEG options -- the camera can now shoot only JPEGs as well as raw+JPEG -- and the company says it's improved the JPEG quality. Plus, the GPS now comes integrated into the camera rather than as an add-on module.