Pennies

What makes the new Volvo S60 an Editors' Choice vehicle? It's not just the world-first safety features and value for money, but the little things, too.

Prices begin at AU$51,950 for the T5, AU$57,950 for the D5 and AU$64,950 for the T6.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Brrrrrrrrrrrrrm

The T6's turbocharged straight-six petrol engine has 224kW of power and 440Nm of torque on offer.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Under the hood

A 177kW/320Nm four-cylinder turbo-petrol (T5) and a 151kW/420Nm turbo-diesel (D5) are also available.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Watered down

It mightn't have the outright sex appeal of the S60 concept car, but it's still pretty good looking.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

AWD

All-wheel drive is standard on the T6 and nixes any worries that you might have about torque steer.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Money ain't the thing

Want a bit more bling? There's an optional R-Design pack for the T5 and T6 that brings its own alloy wheels, interior styling tweaks and tons of little R-Design badges.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Light my way

Optional xenon headlights not only shine a piercing light into the night, they also follow the driver's steering inputs. Next to the grille are the LED driving lights.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Black box

Mounted in the grille is a radar for the car's active cruise control system and various safety features.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Goal!

At night, the tail-lights form a very pleasing hockey stick shape.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Sleipner

Gorgeous 18-inch Sleipner alloy wheels are standard on the T6.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

BLIS

Below the wing mirror is a camera for the blind-spot warning system (BLIS).

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

BLIS

When the system detects a car moving in the same direction in your over-the-shoulder blind-spots, an orange light goes on.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

See more

Both wing mirrors feature a highly curved section at the far edge.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Mind your head

Thanks to the coupe-like roofline, head room in the back is tight.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Backseat driver

Leg room can be a bit tight, too, depending on who's sitting in the front.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Splitting the atom

The rear seats split-fold 60/40.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Doing the splits

Before you can utilise the 60/40 split-fold rear seats, you need to use the backrest release located in the boot.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Left-hand drive, anyone?

The bonnet release is on the passenger's side.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Here's lookin' at you

The T6's matte chrome finishings not only look nice, but avoid the glare issues of shiny chrome.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Luggage space

Boot space at 380 litres is sufficient and no more.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Flip it

There's a flip-up divider in the boot.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Goop

Under the floor there's some tyre sealant, but no spare wheel.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Flexible

Carrying long planks of wood? No worries, the front passenger's seat tilts forwards.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Tie me kangaroo down, sport

The front seats feature a small storage pouch.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Back it up

Rear parking sensors are standard, but a reversing camera is an AU$795 option on all S60s.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

The place to be

Audi levels of interior quality are matched with Swedish decorating flair.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Turn it around

The leather-clad steering wheel is a pleasure to hold, but the power steering system doesn't feed much information back to your fingertips.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Sit down

The leather seats do a wonderful job of imitating a sofa.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Roughing it

Soft, supple leather of various grains is used throughout the cabin.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Face time

Unlike many rear seat vents, the S60's aren't just for your feet.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Remember me

A powered driver's seat with memory is standard throughout the S60 range.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Air controlled

Climate control air conditioning is standard throughout the S60 and the V60 line-up.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Safety switch

The bottom button not only disables all window controls except for the driver's, but also enables the child safety locks.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

A shark's tale

FM reception is fine, but listening to AM radio with the engine on is like trying to decipher an alien transmission through all the static and background noise.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Safety margin

These buttons on the steering wheel's left spoke adjust the active cruise control's speed and safety distance settings, as well as the system that warns you if you're following the car in front too closely.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Danger, Will Robinson

Lights at the base of the windscreen warn you if you're following the car in front too closely. Orange lights are the least severe warning, with flashing red lights and an audio warning, followed by computer-controlled braking.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

City Safety

City Safety utilises cameras and sensors mounted high on the windscreen, and if it detects an imminent rear-ender, it will brake the car. It is able to avoid accidents at speeds of up to 30km/h. City Safety is standard on all S60s and V60s.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Great expectations

The premium sound system is standard on the T6, and sounds excellent, as it should.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Self-shifting

All Aussie-bound S60s come with a six-speed auto. On the D5 and the T6, there's a sport mode available.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Plug it in

With keyless start, you don't need to put the key in, but you can if you want to.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Hide and seek

Behind the air-con and sound system controls is a small padded nook perfect for a pair of sunnies.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Forget me not

The location of the electronic parking brake makes it incredibly easy to forget.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Let it rain

Rain-sensing windscreen wipers are standard throughout the S60 range.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Navigation

In the D5 and T5, navigation can only be specified if the optional 7-inch high-res screen is fitted. Both the 7-inch screen and nav are standard on the T6.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Sensus

The Sensus entertainment and nav menu system can be navigated by this less-than-handy knob and button combo.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Sensus

Alternatively, and more conveniently, too, there are these controls on the steering wheel.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Sensus

The only way to switch between different functions on the Sensus entertainment and nav system is via the buttons on the dash.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Watch me

The 7-inch screen is brilliant in its high-resolution glory and can play DVD video and DivX files on USB.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Entertainment time

Navigating music and movies stored on USB is quick and easy.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Waiting

Using iPods with large music libraries can be trying on one's patience.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Voice control

Available voice commands are displayed on-screen.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Voice control

The system will recognise names straight out of your phonebook without any training.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Voice control

It won't let you enter new destinations via voice, though.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET

Info centre

The displays in the instrument panel cram in cruise control, fuel economy and trip computer info, but there's no space for navigation instructions.

Photo by: Derek Fung/CNET
Latest Galleries

BEST LIST

Find the best hybrids on the market!

Hybrid technology can be applied to any type of car, and the best show the most significant fuel economy improvements over a similar gasoline-only car.

Latest From Roadshow