They say a picture tells a thousand words, so here's seven thousand words on the Smart ForTwo cabrio's more unique features.

Click here for a full review of the Smart ForTwo cabrio.

Hey there little 'un
At just 2.5m long, the Smart ForTwo cabrio is dwarfed by anything on four wheels, including this Peugeot 307.

Photo by: Derek Fung

Innards
Passengers often described the ForTwo's interior as cool, especially the pods mounted in the middle of the dash. They swivel through about 90 degrees and house the tachometer and clock. The centrally mounted tacho takes a little bit of getting used to though.

Photo by: Derek Fung

Centre console
Here you'll find the ignition, gear lever — push up and down to change gears — and switches to operate the folding roof, which unfortunately are the only buttons in the cabin not to be illuminated at night.

Photo by: Derek Fung

Going topless
Clockwise from top left: completely shielded from the elements; roof retracted but with the windscreen still up; roof collapsed and blocking rear vision; and the Smart ForTwo in its most naked form, without its roof rails, which are stored in a compartment in the tailgate.

Photo by: Derek Fung

What a difference a windscreen makes
Rearward vision is okay with the rear windscreen up. However, when the top is fully dropped it obscures most of the useful view out back.

Photo by: Derek Fung

Come check out my goodies
For a more complete wind-in-your-hair experience you can remove the Smart ForTwo's roof rails, which can then be stored in a special compartment in the car's flip-down tailgate.

Photo by: Derek Fung

Wide open spaces
The ForTwo's boot may not boast many litres but there's sufficient room back there to carry a week's worth of shopping for two or, if you're that way inclined, a cricket bag. A sliding luggage cover is standard fitment, but even when fully retracted it will impede some of your taller luggage, such as buckets and the like. Also, your groceries may be a little warmer when you get home as the boot area is right above the engine.

Photo by: Derek Fung
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