The Sony MEX-BT2500 features a simple, single-DIN-size faceplate with an open CD slot and a standard arrangement of hard buttons along the bottom of the bezel. To the left of the unit's white-on-black monochrome display, the rotary volume-knob doubles as a start/end call control, while six hard buttons surrounding it constitute the main control selections.

Updated:Caption:CNET Reviews staffPhoto:CNET Networks

The MEX-BT2500 supports the A2DP and AVRCP profiles, enabling users to stream and control audio played from a Bluetooth-enabled phone or music player.

Updated:Caption:CNET Reviews staffPhoto:CNET Networks

With a Bluetooth audio device paired, the controls on the front of the stereo faceplate can be used to skip and pause tracks.

Updated:Caption:CNET Reviews staffPhoto:CNET Networks

The MEX-BT2500 can be used to play regular CDs as well as discs encoded in the MP3 and WMA formats. When playing digital-audio discs, the monochrome LCD shows ID3 tag information for artist, album, and song title.

Updated:Caption:CNET Reviews staffPhoto:CNET Networks

For playing non-Bluetooth-enabled devices, the MEX-BT2500 has a 1/8-inch line-in jack, through which drivers can connect portable audio players.

Updated:Caption:CNET Reviews staffPhoto:CNET Networks

The system can be paired with as many as five cell phones simultaneously. One of the limitations of the MEX-BT2500's hands-free calling interface is that it cannot be used to place outgoing calls, other than redialing a connected cell phone's last number. We are also disappointed with the outgoing call quality via the system's built-in microphone.

Updated:Caption:CNET Reviews staffPhoto:CNET Networks
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