The Pagani factory is where all Zondas and Huayras are hand built to absolute perfection, come with us on a tour of where the magic happens.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Photo by: Roo Lewis
The Pagani factory is near Bologna, Italy.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Horacio Pagani formerly worked for Lamborghini.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Pagani developed some of the first all-composite-material cars.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Pagani was born in Argentina but moved to Italy to join the car industry.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Pagani came to Italy equipped with a letter of recommendation from legendary F1 driver, Fangio.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Pagani's first car, the Zonda, was unveiled in 1999.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Pagani describes his cars as "art, emotion, and technology."
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Not only are the cars made here, they are shipped back for servicing and repairs all in the same workshop.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Pagani only makes a very small volume of cars for a very select clientele.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
You can get your Huayra in pretty much any colour you want.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Huayras are some of the most exclusive cars on the planet.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
The Huayra was first unveiled at the 2011 Geneva auto show.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
A focus on lightweight materials is key to all Paganis.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
The interior of every Pagani has as much effort put in as the exterior.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Luggage room is at a premium in the Huayra.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Your custom luggage can be made to match the interior leather.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
And that is room for an umbrella.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Photo by: Roo Lewis
The sound system in the Huayra is described as a personal concert.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Behind the seats there's room for a suit bag.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Every detail on a Pagani feels premium.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
The engine is custom-made by AMG.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Photo by: Roo Lewis
The bi-turbo V12 sounds phenomenal.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
The quad exhausts are a Pagani trademark.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
The anodisation colour can be chosen by the customer.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Pagani has two facilities, walking distance from each other.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
This is an autoclave, where parts of the car are baked.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Gifts to Pagani from customers are dotted around the factory.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
This was the colour used on Lewis Hamilton's Zonda.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Display cases with individual parts show how every component on a Pagani is a work of art.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Pagani prides itself on how its cars are handcrafted to perfection.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Leather and metal, in harmony in every Pagani.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
All of the carboninium is applied by careful hands.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Horacio's signature on the side of a Huayra.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
No robots in this factory, just old-fashioned tool drawers.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
We saw several Huayras and Zondas either being built or repaired.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
No workshop is complete without a smutty calender.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Photo by: Roo Lewis
The Pagani factory is about as far removed from a production assembly line as it's possible to get.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Instead of the constant drone of machinery, the Pagani factory is a calm and composed space.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
When you spend as much on a car as a Huayra, you expect everyone to take time in its production.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Twenty years ago it would have seemed crazy to imagine that a company could come out of nowhere to put its name among those of Ferrari and Lamborghini.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Yet, as soon as the Zonda shot to fame, the name Pagani was shot into the conscience of car fans everywhere.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
It's hard to imagine the hypercar landscape without Pagani now.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
In a time where others are exploring hybrid hypercars, Pagani is sticking to good, old-fashioned petrol-only engines.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
A Zonda Revolution will get you round the 'Ring in well under 7 minutes if you know what you're doing. As little as 6.5 if you're a pro.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Soon these will be sat on by a very lucky person.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
The centre rev counter is a nice touch on this Zonda wheel.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
That's the first Huayra ever delivered to a customer, in for a service.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
This single piece of aluminium will become the instrument cluster in a Huayra.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Carbon fibre tubs are everywhere you turn in the factory.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
No matter how badly damaged your Pagani is, the factory can fix it.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
That's a pretty cool plate, right there.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
This is in the new factory.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Photo by: Roo Lewis
The new factory will be roughly five times the size of the old one.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
A naked Huayra nose.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
If you're going to go very fast, you need to be able to stop.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Why do people choose to have their cars painted?
Photo by: Roo Lewis
A Zonda Revolution awaits final inspection, ready for delivery.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Patriotism is alive and well.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Cleanliness to rival McLaren?
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Is it just us, or does this look like a spaceship?
Photo by: Roo Lewis
There are worse sights to greet you at the beginning of a workday.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
You wouldn't really get sick of working here, would you?
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Finishing touches are painstakingly put on a Huayra interior.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
AMG's engines have always sat in Pagani cars.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Just...yes.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
There's always time for a coffee -- which is very nice at the Pagani factory.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Each car receives special attention.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Not your average spares shelf.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
How does it manage to look cool even without any wheels?
Photo by: Roo Lewis
This is the bare bones of a Huayra.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Big tyres are big.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
The Pagani factory uniform is pretty great.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Basking shark or Pagani?
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Making sure everything lines up...
Photo by: Roo Lewis
That's a lotta horses, right there.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Popping the finishing touches on.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Creating a Pagani is not a quick process.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
There's too much awesome going on right now.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
The contents of those shelves go into making something brilliant.
Photo by: Roo Lewis
Photo by: Roo Lewis
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