2004 Scion xA

2004 Scion xA

2004 Scion xB

2004 Scion xB

2006 Scion xA

2006 Scion xA

2006 Scion tC

2006 Scion tC

2008 Scion tC

2008 Scion xD

2008 Scion xD

2008 Scion xB

2011 Scion tC

2011 Scion tC

2011 Scion tC

2012 Scion iQ

2012 Scion iQ

Scion iQ EV

2013 Scion FR-S

2013 Scion FR-S

2014+ Scion tC

2016 Scion iA

2016 Scion iA

2016 Scion iM

2016 Scion iM

Scion C-HR Concept

The Scion xA was one of the automaker's initial models, based on the Japanese-spec Toyota ist.

Caption by / Photo by Scion

With Scion's initial push for value came some frankly cheap-looking interiors. The iA was powered by a 108-horsepower, four-cylinder engine, achieving 38 mpg highway.

Caption by / Photo by Scion

Toyota's Japanese-market bB became the Scion xB, a car unique for its eminently capacious interior despite its small footprint.

Caption by / Photo by Scion

The funky little xB was available with the same 108-horsepower engine as the xA. The bB's column shifter moved to the floor for the American-spec xB.

Caption by / Photo by Scion

In 2006, the xA received a mild refresh, including new bumpers and side skirts, side-mirror-mounted turn signal indicators and wheel-mounted audio controls.

Caption by / Photo by Scion

The xA was also the first vehicle to offer an optional iPod input.

Caption by / Photo by Scion

Scion expanded its lineup from two to three in 2005 with the introduction of the tC, a car intended to make the brand a bit sportier.

Caption by / Photo by Scion

The tC packed 161 horsepower from its four-cylinder engine, a big boost over the xA and xB. Standard equipment abounded, including air conditioning, power windows, a 160-watt stereo and a panoramic moonroof.

Caption by / Photo by Scion

In 2008, the tC was given a very mild refresh consisting of a new grille, and new headlights and taillights.

Caption by / Photo by Scion

The Scion xD came about in the 2008 model year as a replacement for the aging xA.

Caption by / Photo by Scion

Power output was bumped up to 128 hp, with highway fuel economy down to approximately 33 mpg highway. Like the xA, it was available with either a manual or automatic transmission.

Caption by / Photo by Scion

The same year the xD came out, Scion also unveiled a second-generation xB. Having lost some of the quirky-box flair that made the first generation a hit, the xB was larger and aimed solely at the American market. Sales plummeted, much to the company's chagrin.

Caption by / Photo by Scion

The 2011 tC marked the beginning of the coupe's second generation. Performance was up, and much of the first-gen tC's styling cues remained, including its flat roof design.

Caption by / Photo by Scion

The tC continued to be a hit with the aftermarket, with a variety of upgrades available from both TRD (Toyota Racing Development) and third-party companies.

Caption by / Photo by Scion

The tC's newfound power came by way of a new engine, a 180-horsepower four-cylinder borrowed from the Toyota Camry.

Caption by / Photo by Scion

The Scion iQ is a rebadged version of the Toyota iQ, a diminutive city car meant to maximize interior volume while minimizing...well, just about everything else.

Caption by / Photo by Scion

The iQ was powered by a 94-horsepower, four-cylinder engine. In Europe, a rebadged version was marketed as the Aston Martin Cygnet -- no, we're not joking. This was also an Aston Martin.

Caption by / Photo by Scion

Toyota also developed an all-electric variant, the iQ EV. It was largely limited to two markets -- the US and Japan -- as fleet vehicles. In the US, the lion's share of iQ EVs went to early car-sharing programs in California.

Caption by / Photo by Scion

The Scion FR-S was the brand's first genuine sports car, packing a flat-four engine and a rear-wheel drivetrain. It was marketed in Japan as the Toyota 86 -- the Scion name only extended to the US and Canadian markets.

Caption by / Photo by Scion

Critics immediately fell in love with the FR-S' fun factor, bringing solid driving dynamics to a class of car that many thought was on the way out. It's garnered a huge following for being one of the least expensive ways to end up in a new, RWD car.

Caption by / Photo by Scion

Scion gave the tC a big ol' refresh in 2014, updating its exterior appearance to bring it closer to the FR-S' design language. Along for the ride were upgrades like LED taillights, a sportier suspension, new headlights and a fancy new touchscreen audio system.

Caption by / Photo by Scion

Scion's next big introduction came by way of the 2016 iA, a rebadged Mazda2.

Caption by / Photo by Scion

Critics lauded the iA for its excellent handling and standard forward collision warning with autonomous braking, the latter an option not typically found standard on inexpensive machinery.

Caption by / Photo by Scion

The Scion iM, introduced alongside the iA, is a rebadged Toyota Avensis from Japan.

Caption by / Photo by Chris Paukert/CNET

It looks, feels and drives like it could be called the Toyota Corolla Hatchback, and it may very well be that, now that Scion is passing on.

Caption by / Photo by Chris Paukert/CNET

Officially the last car to carry a Scion badge, the C-HR concept presaged a subcompact crossover for the value-oriented brand. It will now become a Toyota.

Caption by / Photo by Scion
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