Outside Tesla's new Sydney showroom

The foyer

The showroom

Design

Wall art

The "skateboard"

The motor

The small details

The dash

Charge!

Charging up the Model S

Nothing under the hood

For the fans

The key

As Tesla Motors prepares to deliver Model S vehicles to a handful of Australian customers, the first Tesla showroom and service centre in the Australian market is preparing to open its doors in the Sydney suburb of St Leonards.

Caption by / Photo by Claire Reilly/CNET

Inside, the distinctive Tesla Motors logo and red feature colour dominate the foyer.

Caption by / Photo by Claire Reilly/CNET

Visitors can take a tour of the showroom and get up close with the Model S, while learning all about the internal workings of the car, as well as the different design details (left) that can be incorporated into the final vehicle.

Caption by / Photo by Claire Reilly/CNET

A wall at the front of the showroom shows all the different details and finishes that customers can choose for their Model S. Interiors come in piano black as standard, but there are options for carbon fibre and wood detailing, as well as different colours for the exterior paint job.

Caption by / Photo by Claire Reilly/CNET

At the rear of the showroom, Tesla has set aside an area for visitors and prospective buyers, complete with a bit of aspirational wall art.

Caption by / Photo by Claire Reilly/CNET

Tesla's "skateboard" base sets it apart from traditional cars, thanks to its ultra-simple design. The flat base of this skateboard is comprised of 16 battery modules containing  7,000 lithium-ion battery cells, ensuring the Model S has the power to make it between charges.

At the front of the Model S, where one would normally expect to find a traditional motor, this EV features small components that control things such as battery cooling and air conditioning.

Caption by / Photo by Claire Reilly/CNET

The motor -- containing only one moving part -- sits at the rear of the Model S and offers 285 kW of power. Tesla also plans to release a dual motor model to the Australian market in Q3, 2015.

Caption by / Photo by Claire Reilly/CNET

The Model S features a number of optional design extras, including carbon fibre inlay on the dash and suede seat detail, as well as these signature red break calipers on the P85D Performance model.

Caption by / Photo by Claire Reilly/CNET

The dash is distinctive for its full electronic display and a massive screen that shows off all the inner workings of the Model S. Drivers can control the sunroof, music and interior lighting from the display, and a built-in SIM offers 4 years worth of 3G coverage as standard.

There are also options to save the position of the mirrors and seat under a 'driver profile' for the next trip, while suspension settings can be geotagged so the Model S will remember just how steep your driveway is every time.

Caption by / Photo by Claire Reilly/CNET

To ensure you make it to your destination, the Model S allows you to track the juice in the EV's battery and schedule overnight charging to take advantage of off-peak electricity rates.

Caption by / Photo by Claire Reilly/CNET

The charging port is concealed at the rear of the vehicle. The Model S will ship with a wall-connector for home use, and Tesla promises that "there is a supercharger network coming" for Australia.

Caption by / Photo by Claire Reilly/CNET

With all the inner workings of the car hidden in the base, popping the hood at the front of the Model S just reveals more storage.

Caption by / Photo by Claire Reilly/CNET

If you're not too fussed about spending upwards of AU$100,000 for the premium Model S, you can spend a little extra to buy additional merchandise to complete the look.

Caption by / Photo by Claire Reilly/CNET

Doing away with the traditional cut metal key, the Tesla Model S is controlled by a miniature model of the car that also offers keyless entry.

The first "signature" Model S customers will get their hands on one of these at Tesla's gala launch event, held at Sydney's Star Casino.

Caption by / Photo by Claire Reilly/CNET
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