If you were absolutely in love with the Ferrari FF, we've got some bad news for you. Well, maybe.

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The Ferrari FF is no more, and in its place is this -- the GTC4Lusso.

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The GTC4Lusso takes an evolutionary, not revolutionary, approach to Ferrari's shooting brake.

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But, at the same time, it's also a bit of a throwback.

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Both the GTC and Lusso parts of its name are references to Ferraris of old.

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The number 4, on the other hand, could refer to several things -- seating capacity, number of driven wheels or how many wheels are capable of steering the car.

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The GTC4Lusso borrows its rear-wheel steering from the F12 Berlinetta.

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The GTC4Lusso's engine is a 6.3-liter V-12.

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That engine is cranking out 680 brake horsepower and 514 pound-feet of torque.

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That's enough to catapult the car to 62 mph in 3.4 seconds, and it'll pull all the way up to 208 mph.

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The GTC4Lusso's interior still contains the right-side display from before, which puts pertinent information (revs, speed and so on) in front of the passenger.

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Ferrari certainly has a way with interiors, doesn't it?

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If you have a passenger who has a tendency to freak out in fast cars, you might want to put them in the rear seat instead.

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Another new bit of interior tech is sitting front and center -- a 10-inch, high-definition touchscreen infotainment system.

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The steering wheel's quintessential mode knob (called the manettino, Italian for "little lever") is present and accounted for.

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The turn signals are still on the steering wheel, too.

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The GTC4Lusso's sport seats look quite supportive.

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Naturally, the screens on either side of the tachometer can be customized to display different kinds of data.

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If you've never driven a car before, and you hop into this GTC4Lusso, you're going to be awfully confused when you get into your second car.

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This new infotainment screen bears absolutely no resemblance to anything from Fiat Chrysler, which still owned Ferrari when this car was developed.

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One of the largest design changes between FF and GTC4Lusso is the strong brow that spans the entire rear end.

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"More than you can afford, pal."

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In fact, that strong line across the rear end resembles a unibrow.

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Ferrari probably doesn't appreciate us saying that its car has a unibrow, though.

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Carbon ceramic brakes? But of course.

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The best part of a shooting brake? You can actually store things in it.

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