GENEVA -- Design firm ED presented what it called a self-driving race car here at the 2015 Geneva auto show.

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Torq, the ED race car, shows no driver cockpit in its smooth shell.

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An electric car, Torq uses four motors and a 1,212-pound lithium-ion battery pack. Total weight is only 2,205 pounds (1,000 kg).

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Racing aerodynamics contribute downforce, and with no driver, Torq would likely be able to corner faster.

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Its four wheel motors give Torq 1,327 pound-feet of torque.

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Top speed is rated at only 155 mph, a little slow for a race car.

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ED expects Torq to handle a 4-minute lap at Le Mans.

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A rear wing contributes to downforce.

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Despite its self-driving design, ED includes space for a human under the shell.

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This rendering suggests a human "driver" would see outside of the car through a screen and camera system.

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ED envisions the Torq as a development environment for autonomous cars.

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