The Tucson's redesign is handsome, if a bit conservative.

Caption by / Photo by Chris Paukert/CNET

It's easy to see how much design DNA is shared between this vehicle and its Santa Fe big brother.

Caption by / Photo by Chris Paukert/CNET

A tapered greenhouse and blacked-out rear privacy glass lend the Tucson an athletic profile.

Caption by / Photo by Chris Paukert/CNET

Dark trim makes it seem like the headlamps snug up directly to the five-pointed grille's slats.

Caption by / Photo by Chris Paukert/CNET

A tailgate that extends all the way to the bumper hints at Tucson's easy-to-access cargo bay.

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The Eco's 225/60 H-rated tires and alloy wheels look significantly meeker than the Tucson Sport and Limited models' 19-inch running gear.

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The way the D-pillar flares outward suggests poor rear visibility, but thanks to clever mirrors, it's not bad.

Caption by / Photo by Chris Paukert/CNET

Halogen projector headlamps are standard equipment on most trims, but HID units are available on the range-topping Limited.

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Whistle-shaped tail lamps gain LED illumination in Limited trim.

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Alloy wheels are standard across the Tucson line, as is a tidy 34.9-foot turning circle regardless of model.

Caption by / Photo by Chris Paukert/CNET

Cleverly integrated blind-spot mirrors are a low-tech but very effective solution to rear visibility issues.

Caption by / Photo by Chris Paukert/CNET

The Eco's cabin has plenty of disappointing materials that the Tucson's higher-level trims do without.

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Analog gauges are easy to read, and steering-wheel controls are simple to use.

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Front-seat comfort is good. Cloth is the only upholstery available with Eco models.

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The rear seat has an adjustable backrest, which is a nice touch.

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A pair of squared-off exhaust tips poke out from beneath the rear fascia.

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No fancy electronic gearshift here -- if it ain't broke, don't fix it.

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A milquetoast 5-inch color touchscreen handles audio chores. Regrettably, a larger screen with navigation is only available on the top-flight Limited model.

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Graphics are clear and easy to read, albeit drab-looking.

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A rear-view camera is standard on all Tucson models, including dynamic parking lines.

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With the rear seats folded, cargo space nearly doubles to 61.9 cubic feet.

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With the rear seats in use, cargo space is 31 cubic feet.

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The Eco's seats are clad in stain- and odor-resistant Yes Essentials fabric.

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A large center console cubby features a pair of 12V outlets, and more importantly, a USB input and mini-audio jack.

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Although it's hard to imagine a scenario in which it'd be used, the Tucson features hill-descent control. The drive-mode selector, however, is likely to see more frequent usage.

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Steering wheel controls are helpful and intuitive.

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Badging is the only real visual telltale that this Tucson is an Eco model.

Caption by / Photo by Chris Paukert/CNET

T-GDI stands for "Turbocharged-Gasoline Direct Injection"

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This thoroughly modern 1.6-liter powertrain puts out good numbers, but falls down when it comes to refinement.

Caption by / Photo by Chris Paukert/CNET
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