The Dodge Challenger looks impressive, a retro coupe with high haunches. Dodge launched the Challenger to compete with Chevy's Camaro and Ford's Mustang, all cars heralding to a time of affordable, big power.
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This special edition Challenger gets these 392 Hemi badges on the fenders, adding a little more flair to a car that already announces its presence with a big exhaust burble.
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The cylinders displace 6.4 liters, or 392 cubic inches if you want to measure it that way. This big V-8 uses very little modern technology other than its fuel-injection system. It produces 470 horsepower and 470 pound-feet of torque, controlled by the driver with a very sensitive gas pedal.
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Optioned on this car are Goodyear F1 Supercar three-season tires, P245/45ZR20 at the fronts and P255/45ZR20 on the rears. The four-piston Brembo brakes come standard.
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The Challenger still uses a hydraulically-boosted power-steering system but gets an adaptive suspension, the most high-tech element of this car.
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Dodge helpfully labels the fuel filler cap.
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At 16.2 cubic feet, the trunk is not large, but usable.
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Red leather seems a little much, but considering the showiness of the car, there is really no alternative.
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The rear seats are designed as two buckets, although someone's little sister could sit for short times in the middle.
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The Challenger is prone to understeer, but giving it the right amount of throttle in a turn brings it around nicely.
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White gauge faces are a nice touch, while the manual transmission makes the tachometer indispensable.
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The Challenger uses Dodge's older generation of cabin tech, relying on a small touch screen for the interface.
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The destination entry design is not pretty, but it is functional.
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The navigation system does a good job of using its traffic data to proactively find alternate routes.
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Along with a USB port for flash drives or iOS devices, the Challenger also supports Bluetooth streaming.
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An import function lets you copy music to the car's internal hard drive.
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With music on a USB drive, the car's interface shows just a file-and-folder structure. For iOS devices, it shows a full music library, with categories for album, artist, and genre.
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The Challenger includes satellite radio but not HD radio.
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There are two voice-command systems, one for navigation and one for the phone system. Hitting the phone voice-command button brings up this screen, which helpfully shows you what you can say.
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