BMW has its M, Mercedes-Benz has its AMG, Audi has its RS, and Jaguar has its R. The standard XF model is already powerful, but add a supercharger and high-tech suspension gear, and the car becomes truly track-worthy.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
1
of 20

The XFR gets some small cosmetic changes from the base XF, such as hood vents embossed with the word supercharged, along with bigger air scoops in the fascia.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
2
of 20

What really sets the XFR apart from the XF is this supercharged direct-injection 5-liter V-8, a work of art producing 510 horsepower.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
3
of 20

Unlike its stablemate, the XK, the XFR's style is more subtle. It is a four-door sedan with gently curved lines.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
4
of 20

The XFR gets quad rear pipes to vent exhaust from its massive powerplant. Its underpinnings include what Jaguar calls an Active Rear Differential, which pushes power to the outside wheel aggressively in a turn.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
5
of 20

Jaguar makes one of the nicer interiors in the car business, with leather, wood, and metal, and only minor use of plastics.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
6
of 20

Jaguar includes a few R badges around the car, with one on the lower spoke of the steering wheel.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
7
of 20

The XFR uses adaptive cruise control, activated by pushing up on the left rocker switch. The right rocker switch sets the following distance to the car in front.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
8
of 20

The checkered flag on the instrument cluster display lets you know the car is in dynamic mode.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
9
of 20

Jaguar uses this innovative dial shifter, which rises up from the console when the engine is fired up. Other buttons around the shifter control dynamic mode, turn off stability control, and activate a speed limiter.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
10
of 20

The XFR uses a touch screen for most of its applications, with metal buttons below for basic climate and audio control.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
11
of 20

We found this home screen annoying, as you have to go through it to access navigation, phone, climate, and audio.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
12
of 20

The navigation system in this car is only average. Route guidance works reasonably well, but it lacks 3D maps, traffic, or other advanced features.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
13
of 20

The Bluetooth phone system is full-featured, including the ability to download contact lists from paired phones.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
14
of 20

This interface is not our favorite. It requires too much attention when choosing music, proving a distraction. This satellite radio interface looks cluttered.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
15
of 20

iPod integration in the XFR works well, with a connector in the console, but the interface looks a little rough.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
16
of 20

The six-disc changer plays MP3 CDs, using this interface to let you navigation folders.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
17
of 20

The Bowers & Wilkins audio system in the XFR produces excellent sound, with a focus on definition.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
18
of 20

The backup camera includes trajectory lines, distance lines, and obstacle warnings.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
19
of 20

The blind-spot warning system lights up this icon in the side view mirror when it is unsafe to change lanes.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Josh Miller/CNET
20
of 20
Up Next

Six generations of the Ford Mustang (pictures)