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VW's ID 4 EV Is Now Assembled in Chattanooga

Volkswagen

If you prefer US-made cars, you can today add Volkswagen's ID 4 to your list. Well, to the list of products assembled in the US, anyway. VW today delivered on its long-pledged promise to bring EV production to its Chattanooga, Tennessee, factory, with the first cars rolling off the line now ahead of anticipated October deliveries. It joins other American-assembled EVs such as Tesla's sedans and SUVs, GM's Bolt family, the Nissan Leaf and the upcoming Cadillac Lyriq.

Plans for this were announced way back in the beginning of 2019, with VW making an $800 million investment into its Chattanooga facility to enable production of what back then was still called the ID Crozz. Today, US-made ID 4 vehicles will use components "mainly" sourced from North America, including Alabama steel and Georgia battery packs from SK Innovation. 

Something had to go to make room for ID 4 production, and sadly that something was the Passat. VW's venerable sedan was just one of many four-doors put to pasture over the past few years as consumers demand more and more crossover SUVs. With that, Chattanooga becomes the sixth facility globally capable of producing VW's MEB-based EVs, a platform that includes the not-for-US ID 3 and the long-awaited ID Buzz

The first flavors of ID 4 built in the US will be all- or rear-wheel-drive with the larger 82-kilowatt-hour battery pack. The promised, more affordable, 62 kWh version is still on target for next year. No pricing on that yet, but we're hoping it'll fall somewhere in the mid-$30,000 range. 

Tim Stevens Former editor at large for CNET Cars
Tim Stevens got his start writing professionally while still in school in the mid '90s, and since then has covered topics ranging from business process management to video game development to automotive technology.
Tim Stevens
Tim Stevens got his start writing professionally while still in school in the mid '90s, and since then has covered topics ranging from business process management to video game development to automotive technology.

Article updated on July 26, 2022 at 5:50 AM PDT

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Tim Stevens Former editor at large for CNET Cars
Tim Stevens got his start writing professionally while still in school in the mid '90s, and since then has covered topics ranging from business process management to video game development to automotive technology.
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