Car Industry

Volkswagen has not yet attempted to recertify its new diesels in the US

Considering diesels formerly comprised 20 percent of the brand's US sales, you'd think that would be important.

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With no certification applications, the future of VW's entire US diesel operation is in question.

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When Volkswagen admitted to willfully cheating on emissions tests around the world, it withdrew its application for Environmental Protection Agency certification for its latest slew of oil-burners. That, combined with a stop-sale for all other models on dealership floors put a dent in the brand's sales, and it appears that things won't be changing for at least a little while longer.

Despite coming to terms with US regulators on a $15 billion settlement, Volkswagen has not yet attempted to get its 2016-model-year diesel vehicles certified for sale in the US. In order to sell a car within the country, an automaker needs to apply for an EPA Certificate of Conformity, which says the car complies with all current emissions regulations.

Volkswagen didn't withdraw its application out of fear, or out of the desire to avoid diesel talk altogether. Instead, as Automotive News notes, the company had a software function within those diesel vehicles that the EPA didn't know about. It wasn't a defeat device like in the cars that spurred the whole Dieselgate hullabaloo, but it was unannounced nevertheless.

The automaker did not immediately return a request for comment.

Removing diesels from its US lineup has not been good for Volkswagen. Diesels used to make up some 20 percent of its stateside sales, and currently, the automaker's sales are down 21.8 percent over June 2015 and down 14.6 percent year-to-date over year-to-date.

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