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Tesla to Grant Access to Thousands of Charging Stations to all EV Drivers

Owners of non-Tesla electric vehicles will be able to use chargers across the US by the end of 2024.

White and red Tesla logo on charging station dock

Tesla pledged to open up at least 7,500 charging stations to all electric vehicles.

Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

Tesla will open a portion of its network of charging stations to all electric vehicles, the White House said Wednesday. This is a first for the company in the US and is part of the Biden administration's effort to create a national network of EV chargers. 

The US government seeks to build infrastructure for electric vehicles with more than 100,000 chargers for public use. 

Tesla, General Motors and Pilot are among the companies that will finance the project with private money, alongside federal subsidies. The federal program allots $7.5 billion for EV charging, and the government will partner with states to disburse the funds. 

Tesla has agreed to open up for public use 3,500 new and existing superchargers across the US by the end of 2024, in addition to 4,000 Level 2 charging docks. EV owners will be able use the Tesla app or website to access the chargers. 

Tesla has more than 40,000 superchargers around the globe. The company began opening up its charging network to non-Tesla drivers in 2021 in Europe. 

Kourtnee Jackson Senior Editor
Kourtnee covers TV streaming services and home entertainment news and reviews at CNET. She previously worked as an entertainment reporter at Showbiz Cheat Sheet where she wrote about film, television, music, celebrities, and streaming platforms.
Expertise Kourtnee is a longtime cord-cutter who's subscribed to streaming services like Netflix, Hulu, Disney Plus, Max, Crunchyroll, Spotify and more. As a real-life user of these services, she tracks the newest releases and developments in streaming. Credentials
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Kourtnee Jackson
Kourtnee covers TV streaming services and home entertainment news and reviews at CNET. She previously worked as an entertainment reporter at Showbiz Cheat Sheet where she wrote about film, television, music, celebrities, and streaming platforms.

Article updated on February 15, 2023 at 7:44 AM PST

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Kourtnee Jackson Senior Editor
Kourtnee covers TV streaming services and home entertainment news and reviews at CNET. She previously worked as an entertainment reporter at Showbiz Cheat Sheet where she wrote about film, television, music, celebrities, and streaming platforms.
Expertise Kourtnee is a longtime cord-cutter who's subscribed to streaming services like Netflix, Hulu, Disney Plus, Max, Crunchyroll, Spotify and more. As a real-life user of these services, she tracks the newest releases and developments in streaming. Credentials
  • Though Kourtnee hasn't won any journalism awards yet, she's been a Netflix streaming subscriber since 2012 and knows the magic of its hidden codes.
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