Tesla adds automatic high beams via over-the-air update

It wasn't available on all Autopilot 2.0 cars in all markets, but now it is.

Tim Stevens/Roadshow

Tesla will occasionally dish out software updates in small bites, offering slight tweaks to existing functions while adding others. This latest update brings parity to all models featuring the newest Autopilot hardware.

Tesla's 2017.32 over-the-air software update, which was made available for Autopilot 2.0 vehicles starting the night of August 16, is on the lighter side of updates. There are small updates to its semi-autonomous Autopilot control algorithm, which it is constantly improving.

The update applies to both Model S and Model X vehicles with Autopilot 2.0 hardware.

Tim Stevens/Roadshow

The most notable part of the update, though, is the addition of automatic high beams for all Autopilot 2.0 vehicles. As Electrek notes, all Autopilot 1.0 vehicles and some Autopilot 2.0 cars in certain markets already had this tech, but now it's been pushed to every Autopilot 2.0 cars in every Tesla market.

Automatic high beams engage the high beams when oncoming traffic is no longer detected, turning them off when that changes. You'll have to navigate to the "Lights" portion of the touchscreen controls to activate or deactivate the feature. A small indicator light on the gauge cluster will let drivers know when it's activated.

Tesla first announced Autopilot 2.0 in October 2016. All vehicles built after that time carry additional hardware capable of full-on autonomy, but that feature remains disabled. In fact, nearly every driver-assist system arrived disabled on Autopilot 2.0 vehicles, coming online only after Tesla tested the features and pushed them to owners via over-the-air updates. Each Autopilot 2.0 car carries eight cameras, 12 ultrasonic sensors and a forward-facing radar emitter.

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