Trucks

Ram shoehorns detuned Hellcat motor into badass Rebel TRX concept

Eat that, Ford Raptor.

Ram

Who *wouldn't* want a Hellcat-powered Ram 1500?

Ram

Fiat Chrysler's favorite activity of late seems to finding items in which to shoehorn the Dodge Hellcat's engine. It's made its way into a Jeep Wrangler concept, and it will soon end up in a Jeep Grand Cherokee. Now, it's moved over to Ram's pickups, with the Rebel TRX concept.

The Rebel TRX utilizes the Hellcat's 6.2-liter, supercharged V8 engine, which in this truck puts out just 575 horsepower, instead of the usual 707. It mates to an eight-speed automatic and an off-road-ready 4WD system to create a dune runner that can blast over the unbeaten path at triple-digit speeds.

It wouldn't be a proper off-roader without proper suspension, but thankfully, Ram thought ahead. All four wheels have more than a foot of suspension travel, and those wheels are wrapped in 37-inch off-road tires. The front and rear axles are beefed up, as well, to handle both the terrain abuse as well as the power. Ride height is up to 13 inches, as well.

For the truck nerds, here are some specifics: The 4x4 system utilizes a BorgWarner 44-45 transfer case with four different modes of operation. The rear axle is a Dynatrac Pro 60 unit connected to 35-spline, 1.5-inch axle shafts. The suspension utilizes 2.5-inch bypass shocks with the stock mounts. The wheels have beadlocks and were built specifically for this truck.

One look at the thing and you can tell it means business. Not only is it loaded up with TRX badges and decals, it sports a 6-inch wider track, a taller hood to accommodate the supercharger and 5-inch, side-exit exhaust pipes. The interior rocks a custom camera mount, suede seating, a custom shifter, six-point harnesses and nylon door pulls.

Of course, you're never going to have one of these in your driveway. It's only a concept, meant to throw some shade at Ford's production-spec Raptor pickup. Sure, the TRX packs more power and better equipment in certain spots, but it would be so egregiously expensive that it would barely count as a competitor. There's nothing stopping you from building your own, though.