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One Chinese company promises a turbine-powered EV at Geneva

Whether or not this car will have any basis in reality is yet to be determined.

It wouldn't be an international auto show without some weird stuff cropping up. The wacky idea du jour belongs to Chinese R&D company Techrules and its Turbine-Recharging Electric Vehicle (TREV). Yes, turbine.

Naturally, there isn't a single inch of science in its pre-Geneva-auto-show teaser. Techrules promises that its supercar will use "unprecedented advances" to deliver a car with 1,030 horsepower and a range of more than 1,200 miles. How does that saying go about things that seem too good to be true?

Strangely enough, this isn't the first supercar concept to use turbines. Jaguar's C-X75 concept, launched in 2010, claimed to use small turbines to either generate battery charge or provide direct power to the car's electric motors. The turbines were engineered to run on a variety of fuels, including diesel, biofuel, propane and compressed natural gas.

There won't likely be any additional details until the TREV's debut in March, but for now, it's probably best to not get your hopes up. After all, Faraday Future (an automaker far closer to actually existing) promised electricity for the masses, and we all know how that turned out. Follow CNET's Geneva auto show coverage here.

Jaguar C-X75 hybrid concept is part electric, part frickin' jet

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Andrew Krok Reviews Editor / Cars
Cars are Andrew's jam, as is strawberry. After spending years as a regular ol' car fanatic, he started working his way through the echelons of the automotive industry, starting out as social-media director of a small European-focused garage outside of Chicago. From there, he moved to the editorial side, penning several written features in Total 911 Magazine before becoming a full-time auto writer, first for a local Chicago outlet and then for CNET Cars.
Andrew Krok
Cars are Andrew's jam, as is strawberry. After spending years as a regular ol' car fanatic, he started working his way through the echelons of the automotive industry, starting out as social-media director of a small European-focused garage outside of Chicago. From there, he moved to the editorial side, penning several written features in Total 911 Magazine before becoming a full-time auto writer, first for a local Chicago outlet and then for CNET Cars.

Article updated on February 17, 2016 at 9:22 AM PST

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Andrew Krok Reviews Editor / Cars
Cars are Andrew's jam, as is strawberry. After spending years as a regular ol' car fanatic, he started working his way through the echelons of the automotive industry, starting out as social-media director of a small European-focused garage outside of Chicago. From there, he moved to the editorial side, penning several written features in Total 911 Magazine before becoming a full-time auto writer, first for a local Chicago outlet and then for CNET Cars.
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