McLaren has one thing Tesla doesn't: Profits

Woking's actually in its third year of profitability, and it's building nothing but insanely expensive supercars.

McLaren
2017 McLaren 570GT

McLaren's not in a bad spot, raking in dough and throwing a good portion of it back into research and development for additional models.

McLaren

When it comes to manufacturing expensive, small-batch, desirable supercars, one might not expect it to be a profitable enterprise. McLaren's determined to make money on its efforts, though, and a release of its 2015 financials shows that the company is blowing it out of the water with record sales, continued profits and an ever-expanding network.

Macca's global profits increased to $31.2 million in 2015 on about $600 million in revenue, the company's third successive year of profitability. The company believes its revenue will continue to increase by 50 percent over the next two years, doubling by the end of 2022, which is where the company's current business plan (called Track 22) ends.

Last year, McLaren sold 1,654 cars around the world, 519 of which were sold in the US alone. The company expects to roughly double its volume this year, helped by the release of several new models, like the 675LT, 570S and 570GT. Its retail network is also expanding, with 12 new stores opening up, bringing Macca's total north of 80. Employment rose 16 percent, some of which will go towards doubling its production efforts in 2016.

Clearly, things are going quite well for the small British manufacturer. And there's no signs of slowing down, either -- in fact, it's the opposite. By 2022, McLaren wants to investment $1.32 billion into its own business, adding 15 new or derivative vehicles in that time, at least half of which will feature hybrid powertrains. Last year, McLaren put about 30 percent of its revenue back into research and development.

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