Luxury cars

2017 Lincoln Continental faces early recall

Flagship sedan's headlamp issue triggers safety campaign; Ford also recalls small number of Edge SUVs.

Lincoln

Ford Motor Company has issued a pair of safety compliance recalls, one for the headlights on its brand-new 2017 Lincoln Continental sedan, and the other for a small number of 2015-16 Ford Edge crossover SUVs over ABS concerns.

Nearly 1,900 Lincoln Continentals -- an estimated 1,826 units in the US and a further 49 in Canada among them -- are affected by the recall, which centers on HID headlamps that "may have been misbuilt with LED lenses that are missing the lens optics necessary to meet turn signal visibility requirements." Vehicles found to have defective headlamps will receive free replacements.

Ford is also summoning about 60 2015-16 Edge crossovers sold in the US and Canada back to dealers because they may have inadvertently received faulty ABS software during a previous service. The programming error could disable everything from the vehicle's electronic stability control to its traction control, engine torque control and warning lamp. Affected Edges may also experience electronic parking brake-related issues, including a malfunctioning indicator light and drive-away release function. Recalled models found to have defective ABS units will have their control modules reprogrammed or replaced at no cost.

2017 Lincoln Continental

This is the 10th-generation Lincoln to wear the legendary Continental nameplate.

Lincoln

From a safety standpoint, the smaller Edge recall seems like the more serious of the two campaigns, but the problem with Lincoln's brand-new full-size sedan is arguably the bigger black eye for the Blue Oval. That's because the Continental is Lincoln's reborn flagship model, around which there's a lot of buzz. Loaded with tech and luxury features, the Continental aims to take the Lincoln brand back upmarket, where it will compete against entrenched rivals like the Audi A6 and Mercedes-Benz E-Class.

Fortunately, most of the affected Continentals have not yet reached customers. According to Elizabeth Weigandt, Ford safety communications manager, just 300 units are in buyers' hands; the rest are still at dealers or in transit, meaning they should be repaired before leaving showrooms. Weigandt also notes that affected Continental owners will be able to have their vehicles picked up for repair and dropped off by dealers at their convenience.

Ford says it is unaware of any accidents or injuries related to either the Continental or Edge recall issues.