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GM to add more charging network info to Bolt EV smartphone app

The automaker is partnering with EVgo, ChargePoint and Greenlots.

Chevrolet Bolt EV charging port

Finding a place to do this will soon be simpler for Bolt EV drivers.

General Motors

While General Motors doesn't operate its own electric-car charging network, the automaker does want to make things a little easier for drivers of its Bolt EV who need to recharge their car. By teaming up with EVgo, ChargePoint and Greenlots, GM is adding information on 31,000 US charging stations to the myChevrolet app.

Future updated versions of the app will show the location, availability and other information for the three networks' charge points, making it simpler for Bolt EV drivers to find a place to plug in. GM also says it eventually wants to offer an in-app method to sign up for the networks, and even a way to pay for charging through the myChevrolet app.

The improvements go even further now that the myChevrolet app's Energy Assist feature can be used through Apple CarPlay or Android Auto . That means a Bolt driver can access Energy Assist on the car's touchscreen. The Energy Assist menus include charge station maps and routing advice to help drivers figure out when and where to stop on their journey. Using CarPlay or Android Auto for navigation will be important to drivers given that the Bolt EV does not offer an integrated mapping system on its infotainment system.

GM expects to finalize the partnership with the three charging networks in the first quarter of this year. GM's Maven car-sharing division already has a partnership with EVgo, though in that case it's to offer fast-charging to anyone using a Bolt for Maven Gig.

The 2019 Chevrolet Bolt EV is a balance of power and practicality

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Jake Holmes Reviews Editor
While studying traditional news journalism in college, Jake realized he was smitten by all things automotive and wound up with an internship at Car and Driver. That led to a career writing news, review and feature stories about all things automotive at Automobile Magazine, most recently at Motor1. When he's not driving, fixing or talking about cars, he's most often found on a bicycle.
Jake Holmes
While studying traditional news journalism in college, Jake realized he was smitten by all things automotive and wound up with an internship at Car and Driver. That led to a career writing news, review and feature stories about all things automotive at Automobile Magazine, most recently at Motor1. When he's not driving, fixing or talking about cars, he's most often found on a bicycle.

Article updated on January 9, 2019 at 11:40 AM PST

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Jake Holmes Reviews Editor
While studying traditional news journalism in college, Jake realized he was smitten by all things automotive and wound up with an internship at Car and Driver. That led to a career writing news, review and feature stories about all things automotive at Automobile Magazine, most recently at Motor1. When he's not driving, fixing or talking about cars, he's most often found on a bicycle.
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