Final Bowling Green Massacre survivor on the road to recovery

The 1962 Corvette that was damaged three years ago and has been displayed as-is ever since will finally be restored to its former glory.

This weekend marked the third anniversary of the sinkhole that consumed several cars at the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Kentucky. The museum is commemorating that anniversary by restoring the last survivor that can be repaired.

In total, eight cars fell into the 30-foot cave that opened up. Two, a 2009 ZR1 Blue Devil and the one millionth Corvette ever built, were eventually restored. Five others were damaged beyond repair. Now, three years later, the eighth and final sinkhole car -- a 1962 Corvette which has been displayed as-is since the accident -- is heading to restoration.

It's going to need more than a bit of Bondo.

National Corvette Museum

The restoration work will take place inside the museum, so visitors will have a chance to watch it happen in real time. You can also tune in and check up on the restoration via Facebook or YouTube.

According to the National Corvette Museum's blog post, it needs about $15,000 worth of new parts. That includes a whole new fiberglass front end and a windshield. The whole restoration will cost about $25,000, but General Motors picked up the bill, so the work can continue without funding concerns.

The museum has embraced the Bowling Green Massacre as part of its history. The Skydome now features an outline of the sinkhole, and visitors can even take a peek into the meters-long shaft that claimed the lives of five innocent Corvettes. The two Corvettes that have already been restored have resumed their pre-sinkhole positions on the Skydome floor, as well.

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