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Faraday Future will get its EV batteries from same place as Chevy

LG Chem also supplies the new Chevrolet Bolt.

Faraday Future FFZERO1
Faraday Future

Faraday Future remains largely a mystery. Aside from a series of recent high-profile hires, we haven't seen much from the fledgling electric automaker. But now, we're getting a glimpse at the suppliers that will help Faraday build its first car.

The company has announced a partnership with LG Chem, a major player in EV battery manufacturing and the largest Korean chemical company. A subsidiary of the tech titan LG, it also supplies batteries for the upcoming Chevrolet Bolt EV, so it's safe to say it knows what it's doing.

Faraday claims the two will work together to develop "the world's highest energy density for a production automotive battery," per its press release. That means Faraday's first car could come with some mega range, or a smaller battery that provides solid range without adding too much weight. The battery's cells will be integrated into a scalable platform, which will likely be used in all its future vehicles.

We still don't have any information on what Faraday's first vehicle will be, or even look like. To announce the partnership, Faraday sent out a teaser image of an EV battery cell (above), which I guess counts as a look at the car, albeit a very tiny chunk of it.

Faraday Future made its mark on the industry at CES this past January, when it unveiled the FFZero1 hypercar concept. It wasn't the passenger car concept many were hoping for, but Faraday knows you have to wow the crowd to keep the interest high. I'm very interested in seeing what the company's cooking up, but there's no word when the public might finally get a glimpse of those efforts.

Faraday Future FFZero1 concept unveiled at CES (pictures)

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Andrew Krok Reviews Editor / Cars
Cars are Andrew's jam, as is strawberry. After spending years as a regular ol' car fanatic, he started working his way through the echelons of the automotive industry, starting out as social-media director of a small European-focused garage outside of Chicago. From there, he moved to the editorial side, penning several written features in Total 911 Magazine before becoming a full-time auto writer, first for a local Chicago outlet and then for CNET Cars.
Andrew Krok
Cars are Andrew's jam, as is strawberry. After spending years as a regular ol' car fanatic, he started working his way through the echelons of the automotive industry, starting out as social-media director of a small European-focused garage outside of Chicago. From there, he moved to the editorial side, penning several written features in Total 911 Magazine before becoming a full-time auto writer, first for a local Chicago outlet and then for CNET Cars.

Article updated on October 4, 2016 at 6:00 AM PDT

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andrewkrok.jpg
Andrew Krok Reviews Editor / Cars
Cars are Andrew's jam, as is strawberry. After spending years as a regular ol' car fanatic, he started working his way through the echelons of the automotive industry, starting out as social-media director of a small European-focused garage outside of Chicago. From there, he moved to the editorial side, penning several written features in Total 911 Magazine before becoming a full-time auto writer, first for a local Chicago outlet and then for CNET Cars.
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