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Elon Musk's latest tweet storm: Secret products, smack-talking Big Coal

None of these tweets occurred at 3 a.m. so it's hard to tell if he'd make a good president.

When he's not busy attempting to court Amber Heard, Tesla CEO Elon Musk occasionally throws out some interesting tweets. Over the last day or so, his microblogging missives have been worth reading for a variety of reasons.

First, Musk announced that there will be an "unexpected by most" Tesla product unveil on October 17, followed by a SolarCity update on the 28th (what a great birthday present, Elon, thanks).

While the SolarCity announcement will likely be more information related to Tesla's solar roof project, which pairs a solar-panel-laden roof (for a house, not a car) with Tesla's Powerwall energy storage system, the October 17 event is a relative mystery. Electrek believes it could herald Autopilot 2.0, which would include new hardware, or more news related to the company's eagerly awaited Model 3 car -- a production-ready version, perhaps.

Musk's other notable tweet came just this morning, on the heels of some comments made by Robert Murray, CEO of one of the largest coal mining operations in the US. Murray called Tesla a fraud, complaining that the company exists only because of subsidies. Musk, not one to shy away from a brawl, shot back at the Big Coal CEO, suggesting both industries eliminate subsidies entirely.

Musk claims that Tesla's subsidies amount to pennies on the dollar, with Murray's coal receiving much more government support. There's data to back that up, too -- an International Monetary Fund study from earlier this year posits that fossil-fuel subsidies can reach up to $5 trillion each year globally. Electrek points out that Musk is in favor of a carbon tax, as well, which could leave a lasting impact on the profit-heavy (and profit-hungry) fossil-fuel industry.

Watch this: Tesla Gigafactory Tour
Andrew Krok Reviews Editor / Cars
Cars are Andrew's jam, as is strawberry. After spending years as a regular ol' car fanatic, he started working his way through the echelons of the automotive industry, starting out as social-media director of a small European-focused garage outside of Chicago. From there, he moved to the editorial side, penning several written features in Total 911 Magazine before becoming a full-time auto writer, first for a local Chicago outlet and then for CNET Cars.
Andrew Krok
Cars are Andrew's jam, as is strawberry. After spending years as a regular ol' car fanatic, he started working his way through the echelons of the automotive industry, starting out as social-media director of a small European-focused garage outside of Chicago. From there, he moved to the editorial side, penning several written features in Total 911 Magazine before becoming a full-time auto writer, first for a local Chicago outlet and then for CNET Cars.

Article updated on October 10, 2016 at 12:55 PM PDT

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Andrew Krok Reviews Editor / Cars
Cars are Andrew's jam, as is strawberry. After spending years as a regular ol' car fanatic, he started working his way through the echelons of the automotive industry, starting out as social-media director of a small European-focused garage outside of Chicago. From there, he moved to the editorial side, penning several written features in Total 911 Magazine before becoming a full-time auto writer, first for a local Chicago outlet and then for CNET Cars.
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