Chevy Volt faces hot weather test in Yuma

The Chevrolet Volt went through a series of tests in the Yuma desert. The tests put a lot of stress and strain on the vehicle to determine how durable it will be climbing a mountain in the hottest of conditions.

Chevrolet
The Chevy Volt was put through a series of tests this week under extreme conditions to see how well it could take the heat. General Motors

The folks at General Motors this week continued with hot weather testing of the Chevrolet Volt. The Volt went through a series of Grade Load tests on the Circle Track with a towing dynamometer, which simulates endless hill and mountain climbing. The towing dyno can simulate climbing an incline with anywhere from a 2 to 10 percent grade when it is attached to the Volt, and today's tests were of the 5 and 7.2 percent variety.

A towing option will not be available for the Volt, nor is it recommended--in fact, the team at the GM Desert Proving Grounds in Yuma, Ariz., cut the rear fascia to attach the hitch. This test put a lot of stress and strain on the vehicle to determine how durable it will be climbing a mountain in the hottest of conditions. It was about 103 degrees on Monday when the test was conducted.

Lead durability-testing engineer Steve Pratt described how the mountain-grade test measures the vehicle's performance while driving up mountains in the following video.

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